Posts Tagged ‘Elder Neglect’

Page 1 of 512345

Pressure Sore Injury

Written By: Kenneth LaBore | Published On: 3rd February 2017 | Category: Bed Sores and Pressure Ulcers, Pressure Ulcers | RSS Feed
Nursing Staff Providing Wound Care for Pressure Sore Injury

Nursing Staff Providing Wound Care for Pressure Sore Injury

Nursing Home Pressure Sore Injury

Residents of nursing homes have a few areas of risk that are the greatest, some like falls, being dropped from lifts, medication mistakes, sexual and physical abuse are obvious forms of neglect.  Pressure sore injury is usually neglect that occurs over a period of time and due to a failure to relieve pressure usually aggravated by other factors such as a lack of nutrition and hydration and issues with sanitation and hygiene in the subject facility.

Pressure Sore Injury is Preventable

According to federal regulations, based on the comprehensive assessment of a resident, the facility must ensure that—

(i) A resident receives care, consistent with professional standards of practice, to prevent pressure ulcers and does not develop pressure ulcers unless the individual’s clinical condition demonstrates that they were unavoidable; and

(ii) A resident with pressure ulcers receives necessary treatment and services, consistent with professional standards of practice, to promote healing, prevent infection and prevent new ulcers from developing.

Pressure Sore Injury to Skin and Underlying Tissue

Picture of Pressure Sore From Healthwise

Picture of Pressure Sore From Healthwise

According to WebMD,pressure sores (bed sores) are an injury to the skin and underlying tissue. They can range from mild reddening of the skin to severe tissue damage-and sometimes infection-that extends into muscle and bone. Pressure sores are described in four stages:

Stage 1 sores are not open wounds. The skin may be painful, but it has no breaks or tears. The skin appears reddened and does not blanch (lose color briefly when you press your finger on it and then remove your finger). In a dark-skinned person, the area may appear to be a different color than the surrounding skin, but it may not look red. Skin temperature is often warmer. And the stage 1 sore can feel either firmer or softer than the area around it.

At stage 2, the skin breaks open, wears away, or forms an ulcer, which is usually tender and painful. The sore expands into deeper layers of the skin. It can look like a scrape (abrasion), blister, or a shallow crater in the skin. Sometimes this stage looks like a blister filled with clear fluid. At this stage, some skin may be damaged beyond repair or may die.

During stage 3, the sore gets worse and extends into the tissue beneath the skin, forming a small crater. Fat may show in the sore, but not muscle, tendon, or bone.

At stage 4, the pressure sore is very deep, reaching into muscle and bone and causing extensive damage. Damage to deeper tissues, tendons, and joints may occur.

Additional Information on Pressure Sore Injury

Also see my other blogs on this topic:

Bedsore Stages

Pressure Injury Stages

Pressure Injuries

Pressure Sore Injury Neglect Attorney

If you have questions about nursing home abuse and neglect contact Kenneth LaBore who has handled dozens of very serious pressure sore and ulcer cases for a free consultation.  There is no fee unless there is a verdict or settlement offer from the wrongdoer.  Mr. LaBore can be reached directly at 612-743-9048 or toll free at 1-888-452-6589 or by email at KLaBore@MNnursinghomeneglect.com.

Disclaimer

Facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmail

Minnesota Assisted Living Falls Lawyer

Written By: Kenneth LaBore | Published On: 31st January 2017 | Category: Assisted Living Care Issues, Fall Injuries, Hoyer Lift, Patient Lift, Wrongful Death | RSS Feed
Assisted Living Falls Lawyer and Fracture Injuries

Assisted Living Falls Lawyer and Fracture Injuries

Minnesota Assisted Living Falls Lawyer

There are many types of fall injuries I have seen as a nursing home and assisted living falls lawyer.  Falls can happen when the resident is not given care they need with transfer and toileting or when they are dropped or fall from patient lifts, fall in their wheelchairs, or in the bathroom. Many of these falls would be preventable with proper assessment of the resident’s needs and risks and then adequate care and supervision to prevent accidents.

Falls in assisted living and other elder care situations can lead to fractures such as femur, pelvis and hip, head injuries with complications, such as subdural hematomas, and other injuries some leading to death.

Information About Assisted Living Falls

According to Minnesota Statute 144.7065, Subdivision 1., reports of adverse health care events are required.  Each facility shall report to the commissioner the occurrence of any of the adverse health care events described in subdivisions 2 to 7 as soon as is reasonably and practically possible, but no later than 15 working days after discovery of the event. The report shall be filed in a format specified by the commissioner and shall identify the facility but shall not include any identifying information for any of the health care professionals, facility employees, or patients involved. The commissioner may consult with experts and organizations familiar with patient safety when developing the format for reporting and in further defining events in order to be consistent with industry standards.

Subd. 5. Care management events.  Events reportable under this subdivision are:

(7) patient death or serious injury associated with a fall while being cared for in a facility;

Assisted Living Falls Lawyer

If you need information about assisted living falls or other forms of elder abuse and neglect or other call Kenneth LaBore for a free consultation with no fee unless a verdict or settlement offer by the wrongdoer.  Call Mr. LaBore directly at 612-743-9048 or toll free at 1-888-452-6589 or by email at KLaBore@MNnursinghomeneglect.com.

Disclaimer

 

 

Facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmail

Memory Care Medication Errors

Written By: Kenneth LaBore | Published On: 31st January 2017 | Category: Medication Drug Error, Nursing Home Abuse and Neglect, Wrongful Death | RSS Feed
Minnesota Memory Care Medication Errors

Minnesota Memory Care Medication Errors

Minnesota Memory Care Medication Errors

Attorney Kenneth LaBore is an experienced litigator and memory care medication errors lawyer.  Medication errors are usually not only considered personal injury or negligence claims they are also medical malpractices pursuant to Minnesota Statute 145.682, cases which require expert witness support for allegations of breach in the standard of care and how the mistake caused injury.  Medication mistake cases can also be wrongful death cases under Minnesota Statute 573.01, which require evidence on cause of death, life expectancy and damages to the surviving next-of-kin.

Types of Memory Care Medication Errors

I have seen many types of medication errors and mistakes that have lead to injury, hospitalization and even death.  Some medication mistakes occur without long term negative effect but they may have been meant for pain relief or to assist with sleeping or some other condition and the resident had to suffer without.   Other memory care and senior care facility medication errors are very serious.  There is a mistake which fails to give life supporting medication or high risk prevention medications such as blood thinners and the lack of the medication leads to a complication or condition requiring emergency medical attention.   Some mistakes involve giving the wrong medication to resident which result in injury or death.

For more information about this topic see: Medication Errors.

Contact an Experienced Memory Care Medication Errors Lawyer

If you or a loved one is injured due to a medication error at an memory care or any other type of elder care nursing home or facility contact Kenneth LaBore for a free consultation on how to hold the negligent care provider accountable.  Call Mr. LaBore at 612-743-9048 or toll free at 1-888-452-6589 or by email at KLaBore@MNnursinghomeneglect.com.

Disclaimer

Facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmail

Minnesota Nursing Home Neglect Fractures

Written By: Kenneth LaBore | Published On: 29th January 2017 | Category: Fall Injuries, Hoyer Lift, Patient Lift, Wrongful Death | RSS Feed
Nursing Home Resident Fractures From Falls

Nursing Home Resident Fractures From Falls

Nursing Home Neglect Fractures

Injuries such as nursing home neglect fractures are one of the most common types of elder neglect.   Falls from patient lifts, wheelchairs, in the shower and bathroom or falling from bed being examples.

Information About Nursing Home Neglect Fractures

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, CDC, falls among nursing home residents occur frequently and repeatedly.  About 1,800 older adults living in nursing homes die each year from fall-related injuries and those who survive falls frequently sustain hip fractures and head injuries that result in permanent disability and reduced quality of life.

  • In 2003, 1.5 million people 65 and older lived in nursing homes.  If current rates continue, by 2030 this number will rise to about 3 million.
  • About 5% of adults 65 and older live in nursing homes, but nursing home residents account for about 20% of deaths from falls in this age group.
  • Each year, a typical nursing home with 100 beds reports 100 to 200 falls. Many falls go unreported.
  • Between half and three-quarters of nursing home residents fall each year.  That’s twice the rate of falls for older adults living in the community.
  • Patients often fall more than once. The average is 2.6 falls per person per year.
  • About 35% of fall injuries occur among residents who cannot walk.

Common Cause of Nursing Home Neglect Fractures

The CDC, provides a list of common reasons and causes for the falls and fractures:

  •  Muscle weakness and walking or gait problems are the most common causes of falls among nursing home residents. These problems account for about 24% of the falls in nursing homes.
  • Environmental hazards in nursing homes cause 16% to 27% of falls among residents.
  • Such hazards include wet floors, poor lighting, incorrect bed height, and improperly fitted or maintained wheelchairs.
  • Medications can increase the risk of falls and fall-related injuries. Drugs that affect the central nervous system, such as sedatives and anti-anxiety drugs, are of particular concern. Fall risk is significantly elevated during the three days following any change in these types of medications.
  • Other causes of falls include difficulty in moving from one place to another (for example, from the bed to a chair), poor foot care, poorly fitting shoes, and improper or incorrect use of walking aids.

Nursing Home Neglect Fractures Attorney

If you have questions about nursing home abuse and neglect and fractures or other fall related injuries contact Kenneth LaBore for a free consultation.  There is no fee unless there is a verdict or settlement offer from the wrongdoer.  Mr. LaBore can be reached directly at 612-743-9048 or toll free at 1-888-452-6589 or by email at KLaBore@MNnursinghomeneglect.com.

Disclaimer

Free Consultation on Issues of Elder Abuse and Neglect Serving all of Minnesota Toll Free 1-888-452-6589

Free Consultation on Issues of Elder Abuse and Neglect Serving all of Minnesota Toll Free 1-888-452-6589

 

Facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmail

Elder Abuse and Neglect Summaries

Written By: Kenneth LaBore | Published On: 19th January 2017 | Category: Nursing Home Abuse and Neglect | RSS Feed
Summaries of Issues Related to Elder Abuse and Neglect

Summaries of Issues Related to Elder Abuse and Neglect

Nursing Home Elder Abuse and Neglect Topic Summaries

The following are issues related to finding a nursing home and prevention of elder abuse and neglect, related state and federal regulations as well as ways to research and get information about facilities and providers and types of injuries often suffered by residents who do not receive proper care.

Choosing a Nursing Home

Selecting an Elder Care Facility

Minnesota Department of Health Complaints Against Nursing Home

Special Focus Facility Nursing Homes

Medicare & Medicaid Quality of Care Surveys

Nursing Home Abuse

Nursing Home Neglect

Reporting Nursing Home Abuse and Neglect

Nursing Home Resident Rights

Federal Nursing Home Resident Right Regulations

Minnesota Nursing Home and Elder Care Regulations

Rights for Nursing Home Residents

Definition of Vulnerable Adult

Federal Requirements and Nursing Home Regulations

Nursing Home Facilities with Substantiated Neglect

Nursing Home Abuse and Neglect Injuries

For more information about elder abuse and neglect or questions on how to hold negligent care providers accountable call attorney Kenneth LaBore at 612-743-9048 for a free consultation or by email at KLaBore@MNnursinghomeneglect.com.  There is no fee unless a verdict or settlement with the wrongdoer.

Disclaimer

 

Facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmail

Definition of “Neglect” and Nursing Home Neglect

Written By: Kenneth LaBore | Published On: 8th January 2017 | Category: Caregivers Resources, Department of Health Complaint, Nursing Home Abuse and Neglect, Nursing Home Care Issues | RSS Feed
Minnesota Nursing Home Neglect Definition From The Vulnerable Adults Act

Minnesota Nursing Home Neglect Definition From The Vulnerable Adults Act

Nursing Home Neglect Definition

According to the National Adult Protective Services Association, NAPSA, “neglect” is described as:

  • Physical neglect: includes failing to attend to a person’s medical, hygienic, nutrition and dietary needs, such as dispensing medications, changing bandages, bathing, grooming, dressing, or failure to provide ample food to maintain health.
  • Emotional neglect: includes causing emotional pain, distress or anguish by ignoring, belittling or infantilizing the needs of adults. This includes neglecting or discounting the emotional well being of others, as well as actions to isolate adults from visits or contact by family and friends.
  • Abandonment: involves deserting the caregiving needs of an individual while neglecting to arrange sufficient care and support for the duration of the absence.
  • Financial neglect: involves disregarding a person’s financial obligations such as failing to pay rent or mortgage, medical insurance or invoices, utility and garbage bills, property taxes and assessments.
  • Self-neglect: involves seniors or adults with disabilities who fail to meet their own essential physical, psychological or social needs, which threatens their health, safety and well-being. This includes failure to provide adequate food, clothing, shelter and health care for one’s own needs

Nursing homes are considered mandated reporters and must protect vulnerable adults and file complaints and reports when alleged abuse and neglect.  Pursuant to the Minnesota Vulnerable Adults Act, Minnesota Statute 626.5772, Subd. 17., “neglect” means:

(a) The failure or omission by a caregiver to supply a vulnerable adult with care or services, including but not limited to, food, clothing, shelter, health care, or supervision which is:

(1) reasonable and necessary to obtain or maintain the vulnerable adult’s physical or mental health or safety, considering the physical and mental capacity or dysfunction of the vulnerable adult; and

(2) which is not the result of an accident or therapeutic conduct.

(b) The absence or likelihood of absence of care or services, including but not limited to, food, clothing, shelter, health care, or supervision necessary to maintain the physical and mental health of the vulnerable adult which a reasonable person would deem essential to obtain or maintain the vulnerable adult’s health, safety, or comfort considering the physical or mental capacity or dysfunction of the vulnerable adult.

(c) For purposes of this section, a vulnerable adult is not neglected for the sole reason that:

(1) the vulnerable adult or a person with authority to make health care decisions for the vulnerable adult under sections 144.651, 144A.44, chapter 145B, 145C, or 252A, or sections 253B.03 or 524.5-101 to 524.5-502, refuses consent or withdraws consent, consistent with that authority and within the boundary of reasonable medical practice, to any therapeutic conduct, including any care, service, or procedure to diagnose, maintain, or treat the physical or mental condition of the vulnerable adult, or, where permitted under law, to provide nutrition and hydration parenterally or through intubation; this paragraph does not enlarge or diminish rights otherwise held under law by:

(i) a vulnerable adult or a person acting on behalf of a vulnerable adult, including an involved family member, to consent to or refuse consent for therapeutic conduct; or

(ii) a caregiver to offer or provide or refuse to offer or provide therapeutic conduct; or

(2) the vulnerable adult, a person with authority to make health care decisions for the vulnerable adult, or a caregiver in good faith selects and depends upon spiritual means or prayer for treatment or care of disease or remedial care of the vulnerable adult in lieu of medical care, provided that this is consistent with the prior practice or belief of the vulnerable adult or with the expressed intentions of the vulnerable adult;

(3) the vulnerable adult, who is not impaired in judgment or capacity by mental or emotional dysfunction or undue influence, engages in consensual sexual contact with:

(i) a person including a facility staff person when a consensual sexual personal relationship existed prior to the caregiving relationship; or

(ii) a personal care attendant, regardless of whether the consensual sexual personal relationship existed prior to the caregiving relationship; or

(4) an individual makes an error in the provision of therapeutic conduct to a vulnerable adult which does not result in injury or harm which reasonably requires medical or mental health care; or

(5) an individual makes an error in the provision of therapeutic conduct to a vulnerable adult that results in injury or harm, which reasonably requires the care of a physician, and:

(i) the necessary care is provided in a timely fashion as dictated by the condition of the vulnerable adult;

(ii) if after receiving care, the health status of the vulnerable adult can be reasonably expected, as determined by the attending physician, to be restored to the vulnerable adult’s preexisting condition;

(iii) the error is not part of a pattern of errors by the individual;

(iv) if in a facility, the error is immediately reported as required under section 626.557, and recorded internally in the facility;

(v) if in a facility, the facility identifies and takes corrective action and implements measures designed to reduce the risk of further occurrence of this error and similar errors; and

(vi) if in a facility, the actions required under items (iv) and (v) are sufficiently documented for review and evaluation by the facility and any applicable licensing, certification, and ombudsman agency.

(d) Nothing in this definition requires a caregiver, if regulated, to provide services in excess of those required by the caregiver’s license, certification, registration, or other regulation.

(e) If the findings of an investigation by a lead investigative agency result in a determination of substantiated maltreatment for the sole reason that the actions required of a facility under paragraph (c), clause (5), item (iv), (v), or (vi), were not taken, then the facility is subject to a correction order. An individual will not be found to have neglected or maltreated the vulnerable adult based solely on the facility’s not having taken the actions required under paragraph (c), clause (5), item (iv), (v), or (vi). This must not alter the lead investigative agency’s determination of mitigating factors under section 626.557, subdivision 9c, paragraph (c).

Click here for the definition of elder abuse in the vulnerable adults act.

If you have any questions about reporting concerns or any type of nursing home abuse or neglect call Attorney Kenneth LaBore for a free consultation at 612-743-9048 or by email at KLaBore@MNnursinghomeneglect.com.

Disclaimer

Facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmail

Definition of Vulnerable Adult “Abuse” in Minnesota

Written By: Kenneth LaBore | Published On: 8th January 2017 | Category: Elder Physical Abuse, Nursing Home Abuse and Neglect, Sexual Abuse, Verbal Abuse | RSS Feed
Minnesota Elder Abuse and Neglect Definition Vulnerable Adults Act

Minnesota Elder Abuse and Neglect Definition From The Vulnerable Adults Act

“Abuse” Defined by Statute

Pursuant to Minnesota Statute 626.5772, Subd. 2.,”abuse” means, (a) An act against a vulnerable adult that constitutes a violation of, an attempt to violate, or aiding and abetting a violation of:

(1) assault in the first through fifth degrees as defined in sections 609.221 to 609.224;

(2) the use of drugs to injure or facilitate crime as defined in section 609.235;

(3) the solicitation, inducement, and promotion of prostitution as defined in section 609.322; and

(4) criminal sexual conduct in the first through fifth degrees as defined in sections 609.342 to 609.3451.
A violation includes any action that meets the elements of the crime, regardless of whether there is a criminal proceeding or conviction.

(b) Conduct which is not an accident or therapeutic conduct as defined in this section, which produces or could reasonably be expected to produce physical pain or injury or emotional distress including, but not limited to, the following:

(1) hitting, slapping, kicking, pinching, biting, or corporal punishment of a vulnerable adult;

(2) use of repeated or malicious oral, written, or gestured language toward a vulnerable adult or the treatment of a vulnerable adult which would be considered by a reasonable person to be disparaging, derogatory, humiliating, harassing, or threatening;

(3) use of any aversive or deprivation procedure, unreasonable confinement, or involuntary seclusion, including the forced separation of the vulnerable adult from other persons against the will of the vulnerable adult or the legal representative of the vulnerable adult; and

(4) use of any aversive or deprivation procedures for persons with developmental disabilities or related conditions not authorized under section 245.825.

(c) Any sexual contact or penetration as defined in section 609.341, between a facility staff person or a person providing services in the facility and a resident, patient, or client of that facility.

(d) The act of forcing, compelling, coercing, or enticing a vulnerable adult against the vulnerable adult’s will to perform services for the advantage of another.

(e) For purposes of this section, a vulnerable adult is not abused for the sole reason that the vulnerable adult or a person with authority to make health care decisions for the vulnerable adult under sections 144.651, 144A.44, chapter 145B, 145C or 252A, or section 253B.03 or 524.5-313, refuses consent or withdraws consent, consistent with that authority and within the boundary of reasonable medical practice, to any therapeutic conduct, including any care, service, or procedure to diagnose, maintain, or treat the physical or mental condition of the vulnerable adult or, where permitted under law, to provide nutrition and hydration parenterally or through intubation. This paragraph does not enlarge or diminish rights otherwise held under law by:

(1) a vulnerable adult or a person acting on behalf of a vulnerable adult, including an involved family member, to consent to or refuse consent for therapeutic conduct; or

(2) a caregiver to offer or provide or refuse to offer or provide therapeutic conduct.

(f) For purposes of this section, a vulnerable adult is not abused for the sole reason that the vulnerable adult, a person with authority to make health care decisions for the vulnerable adult, or a caregiver in good faith selects and depends upon spiritual means or prayer for treatment or care of disease or remedial care of the vulnerable adult in lieu of medical care, provided that this is consistent with the prior practice or belief of the vulnerable adult or with the expressed intentions of the vulnerable adult.

(g) For purposes of this section, a vulnerable adult is not abused for the sole reason that the vulnerable adult, who is not impaired in judgment or capacity by mental or emotional dysfunction or undue influence, engages in consensual sexual contact with:

(1) a person, including a facility staff person, when a consensual sexual personal relationship existed prior to the caregiving relationship; or

(2) a personal care attendant, regardless of whether the consensual sexual personal relationship existed prior to the caregiving relationship.

If you have any questions about reporting concerns or any type of nursing home abuse or neglect call Attorney Kenneth LaBore for a free consultation at 612-743-9048 or by email at KLaBore@MNnursinghomeneglect.com.

Disclaimer

Facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmail

St John Home Care Minnetonka Neglect Substantiated

Written By: Kenneth LaBore | Published On: 10th April 2015 | Category: Failure to Resond to Change in Condition | RSS Feed
Neglect of Health Care

Neglect of Health Care at St johns Home Care Minnetonka Minnesota

St John Home Care Minnetonka Complaint Findings for Neglect – Health Care

In a report concluded on April 29, 2013, the Minnesota Department of Health cites St John Home Care Minnetonka for neglect of health care.

The allegation is neglect based on the following: a client has his foot amputated when developed a severe infection after not being adequately assessed and treated for a wound caused by a piece of metal in his foot.

Substantiated Neglect Against St John Home Care Minnetonka

The facility provided written blood sugar readings that varied significantly from the client’s blood sugar monitor readings and there was no documentation that the physician had been notified for the blood sugar reading over 300.

Facility interview and documentation review revealed the client was cognitively impaired and required stand by assistance with activities of daily living.  The client complained of foot pain and medical provider looked at the foot at the facility.  Interviews revealed the medical provider indicated the area on the foot was callous.  Documentation revealed in the week that followed the client was assessed by the nurse 3 times and his vital signs were taken each day.  The vital sign sheet was reviewed and revealed that the client’s vital signs remained within his normal limits on each day.  The nursing notes and interview revealed that the client’s foot assessed the day prior to hospitalization due to pain and not redness or ulceration was noted in his vital signs remained within normal limits.  On the day of hospital admission the client’s foot was assessed due to increased pain and difficulty walking and found to be red with bleeding noted.  His vital signs remained within normal limits as well.  The client was taken to the emergency room for treatment

For more information from the Minnesota Department of Health, Office of Health Facility Complaints concerning nursing homes, assisted living and other elder care providers view resolved complaints at the MDH website.

If you have concerns about medication errors or any other form of elder abuse or neglect contact Elder Abuse and Neglect Attorney Kenneth LaBore at 612-743-9048 or toll free at 1-888-452-6589 or by email at KLaBore@MNnursinghomeneglect.com.

Disclaimer

Facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmail

Minnetonka Assisted Living Neglect Substantiated

Written By: Kenneth LaBore | Published On: 29th March 2015 | Category: Caregivers Resources | RSS Feed
Neglect Resident Required Shower

Neglect Resident Required Shower Minnetonka Assisted Living Minnetonka Minnesota

Minnetonka Assisted Living Complaint Findings for Neglect

In a report concluded on April 7, 2011, the Minnesota Department of Health cites Minnetonka Assisted Living for neglect of health care – resident needed shower.

The allegation is neglect based on the following: Client #1 has arrived at the adult day program on more than one occasion with no incontinence pad, soaked in urine and had dried feces on his legs.  In addition, his feet are dirty and flaky and he does not get a shower as frequently as necessary.

Substantiated Neglect Against Minnetonka Assisted Living – Health Care

According to agingcare.com, the issue of elders who were once reasonably clean adults refusing to take showers and wear fresh clothes is one that is far more common than most people think.

Sometimes the issue is depression. If we have a parent who no longer takes an interest in staying clean or wearing clean clothes, it’s wise to look at depression first. A checkup with a doctor is a good idea, especially if low energy is also part of it, or if they just don’t care about anything at all. Depression isn’t always obvious to an observer.

Find Home Care For Your Loved One – Providers will work with you to create a care plan and find the right caregiver that you will feel comfortable with.
Click here to search for Home Care now

Another factor is control. As people age, they lose more and more control over their lives. But one thing they generally can control is dressing and showers. The more they are nagged, the more they resist. “This younger generation is trying to take over everything. Well, they aren’t telling me when to shower, that’s for sure. Besides, I’m just fine!”

A third issue is a decreased sense of sight and smell. What your nose picks up as old sweat, they don’t even notice. Not on themselves. Not on their mate. Their senses are not as acute as yours, or as theirs once were.

A fourth cause is memory. The days go by. They aren’t marked with tons of activities as they were when they were young. If there isn’t something special about Wednesday, well – it could be Tuesday or Thursday. They simply lose track of time and don’t realize how long it’s been since they showered.

For more information from the Minnesota Department of Health, Office of Health Facility Complaints concerning nursing homes, assisted living and other elder care providers view resolved complaints at the MDH website.

If you have concerns about any form of elder abuse or neglect contact Elder Abuse and Neglect Attorney Kenneth LaBore at 612-743-9048 or toll free at 1-888-452-6589 or by email at KLaBore@MNnursinghomeneglect.com.

Disclaimer

Facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmail

Copperfield Hill Phase II Plymouth Neglect Substantiated

Written By: Kenneth LaBore | Published On: 10th March 2015 | Category: Caregivers Resources, Elder Physical Abuse, Wrongful Death | RSS Feed
Elder Abuse, Physical Abuse by Staff, Neglect of Health Care

Elder Abuse, Physical Abuse by Staff, Neglect of Health Care Copperfield Hill Phase II Plymouth Minnesota

Copperfield Hill Phase II Plymouth Complaint Findings for Physical Abuse

In a report concluded on September 27, 2013, the Minnesota Department of Health cites Copperfield Hill Phase II Plymouth for “other”.

It is alleged that neglect occurred when a client was not adequately assessed prior to readmission from a detox center and once admitted his safety was not properly monitored.  The facility was aware of his history of suicide ideations and that he was scheduled to be transferred in two days to an inpatient 30 day treatment center, yet he was able to obtain narcotics and alcohol sufficient to commit suicide.

Copperfield Hill Phase II Plymouth Complaint Findings for Physical Abuse

In a report concluded on July 29, 2013, the Minnesota Department of Health cites Copperfield Hill Phase II Plymouth for physical abuse by staff.

It is alleged that abuse occurred when a client was hit in the face by the alleged perpetrator (AP) (male staff/name unknown).  When this was reported to administrative staff, the incident was not thoroughly investigated.  In addition, the client is not receiving catheter care, skin monitoring, or fall prevention and monitoring in accordance with her service plan.

Copperfield Hill Phase II Plymouth Complaint Findings for Neglect

In another report concluded on February 17, 2011, the Minnesota Department of Health cites Copperfield Hill Phase II Plymouth for neglect of health care.

The allegation is neglect based on the following: a client did not receive adequate nursing care and services to meet her needs related to her frequent diarrhea.  In addition, some of the client’s medications were discontinued without a prescriber’s order.

For more information from the Minnesota Department of Health, Office of Health Facility Complaints concerning nursing homes, assisted living and other elder care providers view resolved complaints at the MDH website.

If you have concerns about physical abuse, falls, neglect of healthcare or any other form of elder abuse or neglect contact Minnesota Elder Abuse Attorney Kenneth LaBore at 1-888-452-6589 or by email at KLaBore@MNnursinghomeneglect.com.

Disclaimer

Nursing Home Abuse and Neglect Lawyer Kenneth LaBore Offers Free Consultations and Serves Clients Throughout the State of Minnesota Call Toll Free at 1-888-452-6589

Nursing Home Abuse and Neglect Lawyer Kenneth LaBore Offers Free Consultations and Serves Clients Throughout the State of Minnesota Call Toll Free at 1-888-452-6589

 

Facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmail
Page 1 of 512345