Influx of Younger, Sicker Patients Overworks Faribault Nursing Home Workers

Written By: Kenneth LaBore | Published On: 18th November 2013
Nursing Home Abuse Lawyers Kenneth LaBore and Suzanne Scheller - Faribault Nursing Home Injuries

Protect Seniors – Aitkin Nursing Home Abuse Lawyers Kenneth LaBore and Suzanne Scheller – Faribault Nursing Home Injuries

Faribault Nursing Home Workers Under Stress

Mental illness and disability is on the rise among the younger population in state including Faribault nursing home. This is resulting in them being placed in facilities and nursing homes so they can be taken care of. Now the state of Minnesota is about to become very ambitious in an effort to improve the quality of life for disabled individuals as they flood the many facilities throughout the state.

Faribault Nursing Home Deals With Patient Issues

It is believed that many individuals with disabilities are unnecessarily segregated. While many of these individuals are taken care of at home, others are not and this is resulting in the individuals entering nursing homes becoming younger. They are also sicker and this increased population is leading to nursing home workers becoming overworked. Being overworked can lead to nursing home abuse and neglect cases.

Now there is a push for more home-based treatment options. Through home-based treatment options, these individuals will be less restricted and more integrated into the community. This will also result in workers in nursing homes in cities like Minneapolis and Faribault from being overworked.

Disability advocates are very happy with the state’s decision to do something about the disabled and mentally ill having more options, but they have wondered what took so long. The proposal is one that is 14 years in the making. In addition, 29 other states have already made similar proposals.

However, these states, like Minnesota, did not come up with these proposals until they were sued.

In 2009, a lawsuit was filed by the families of three adults who had developmental disabilities. In their lawsuit, they alleged that their disabled loved ones were improperly handcuffed at a Cambridge-based facility. As part of that case’s settlement, Minnesota decided to create a plan to improve the treatment of people with disabilities.

The plan, like the plans from other states, is called an “Olmstead Plan.” In 1999, the U.S. Supreme Court handed down a ruling in the Olmstead v. L.C. case. In this case, an individual with disabilities was segregated and this segregation was deemed as being discriminatory. This landmark ruling has been compared to the Brown vs. Board of Education ruling in 1954 that banned segregation in public schools.

Implementation of an Olmstead Plan will require a cultural change, which means reinforcing positive practices and skills and replacing those practices that cause distress, or emotional, physical, or psychological pain.

It is not known how the plan will take effect. Many of the proposals, such as increasing the amount of affordable housing, will come at a cost. The drafting committee is still working on the monetary aspect of it. It is also being considered to have a permanent office put in place so state agencies can be held accountable for carrying out the plan.

One of the goals that the state wishes to achieve through an Olmstead Plan is to reduce the numbers of individuals going into nursing homes and other care facilities, lessening the load on nurses and other employees. Through affordable housing, home care can be expanded, giving the disabled and mentally ill more freedom and a better quality of life.

Report Suspected – Faribault Nursing Home Abuse and Neglect

Click Here For Link To Report Abuse To Adult Protection

Click Here For Link To Report Abuse To Adult Protection

For more information from the Minnesota Department of Health, Office of Health Facility Complaints concerning nursing homes, assisted living and other elder care providers view resolved complaints at the MDH website.

If you have concerns about financial exploitation or any other form of elder abuse or neglect contact Minnesota Elder Abuse Attorney Kenneth LaBore toll free at 612-743-9048 or toll free at 1-888-452-6589 or by email at KLaBore@MNnursinghomeneglect.com.

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Free Consultation on Issues of Elder Abuse and Neglect Serving all of Minnesota Toll Free 1-888-452-6589

Free Consultation on Issues of Elder Abuse and Neglect Serving all of Minnesota Toll Free 1-888-452-6589

 

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