Posts Tagged ‘Pressure Injury’


Resident at North Ridge Health and Rehab Develops Pressure Ulcer

Written By: Kenneth LaBore | Published On: 13th January 2019 | Category: Pressure Ulcers | RSS Feed
Resident at North Ridge Health and Rehab Suffers Wounds from Poor Care
Resident at North Ridge Health and Rehab Suffers Wounds from Poor Care

MDH Cites North Ridge Health and Rehab after Resident Suffers Pressure Sores

In a report from the Minnesota Department of Health it is alleged that a client at North Ridge Health and Rehab was neglected when the alleged perpetrator (AP) did not provide proper care resulting in wounds on the resident’s left abdomen, groin and right calf.

Failure to Provide Proper Care at North Ridge Health and Rehab Leads to Wounds on Resident

Neglect was substantiated. The facility was responsible for the maltreatment. The resident did not receive proper skin care when the facility failed to provide weekly bathing due to inadequate staffing.

For a Free Consultation with an experienced elder abuse and neglect attorney call Kenneth LaBore at 612-743-9048.

A common form of neglect in elder care facilities involves wound care or wound prevention leading to pressure ulcers or sores. Most forms of elder abuse are preventable with proper care and supervision.

Report Suspected Elder Abuse

Click Here For Link To Report Abuse To Adult Protection
Click Here For Link To Report Abuse To Adult Protection

If you have concerns about care provided to a resident in a nursing home, assisted living or any other type of elder care provider contact Attorney Kenneth LaBore for a Free Consultation to discuss your legal rights and options.

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Resident Develops Sores at Moorhead Rehab & HCC

Written By: Kenneth LaBore | Published On: 13th January 2019 | Category: Bed Sores and Pressure Ulcers | RSS Feed

Recent MDH Substantiated Neglect Finding at Moorhead Rehab & HCC after medication error, medication theft pain management issues.

Resident at Moorhead Rehab & HCC Suffers Stage Four Pressure Sore
Resident at Moorhead Rehab & HCC Suffers Stage Four Pressure Sore

MDH Cites Moorhead Rehab & HCC after Resident Develops Pressure Sores – Wounds

In a report from the Minnesota Department of Health it is alleged that a client at Moorhead Rehab & HCC was neglected when the facility failed to identify multiple decubitus ulcers.

Failure to Provide Proper Care at Moorhead Rehab & HCC Leads to Decubitus Ulcers

Based on a preponderance of the evidence neglect occurred when the resident developed multiple pressure ulcers on both lower extremities. The facility failed to identify, complete a comprehensive assessment, and implement Prevalon boots to prevent the development of pressure ulcers.

For a Free Consultation with an experienced elder abuse and neglect attorney call Kenneth LaBore at 612-743-9048.

A common form of neglect in elder care facilities involves neglect of care which leads or contributes to pressure sores also known as decubitus ulcers. Residents need to have regular wound care along with pressure relief (turning and special mattress or cushions), and nutrition. Most forms of elder abuse are preventable with proper care and supervision.

Moorhead Rehab & HCC Cited with Failure to Supervise Resident who Strikes Another

According to the MDH report and based on a preponderance of the evidence, neglect occurred when a resident threw a pop can at another resident. The facility failed to supervise the resident adequately when s/he hit another resident in the face multiple times.

Report Suspected Elder Abuse

Click Here For Link To Report Abuse To Adult Protection
Click Here For Link To Report Abuse To Adult Protection

If you have concerns about care provided to a resident in a nursing home, assisted living or any other type of elder care provider contact Attorney Kenneth LaBore for a Free Consultation to discuss your legal rights and options.

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Thief River Care Center Neglect Substantiated after Amputation

Written By: Kenneth LaBore | Published On: 14th April 2018 | Category: Failure to Resond to Change in Condition, Pressure Ulcers | RSS Feed

Pressure Sores Leading to Amputation, Failure to Provide CPR at Thief River Care Center in Thief River Falls Minnesota

Pressure Sores Leading to Amputation, Failure to Provide CPR at Thief River Care Center in Thief River Falls Minnesota

Thief River Care Center Thief River Falls Complaint Findings for Neglect of Health Care

In a report concluded on January 10, 2018, the Minnesota Department of Health, cited Thief River Care Center for substantiated neglect of health care leading to an above the knee amputation.  It is alleged that a resident was neglected when the facility did not provide adequate assessment, monitoring and cares to prevent pressure ulcers.   The resident sustained a pressure ulcer that lead to an amputation of a limb.  The resident also sustained additional pressure ulcers on the buttocks and back of head.

Pressure Sores Lead to Above the Knee Amputation of Resident’s Leg

Based on a preponderance of evidence, neglect occurred when the resident developed an unstageable (full thickness ties loss in which the base of the ulcer is covered by a slough (yellow, tan, gray, green or brown) and/or eschar (tan, brown or black) in the wound bed) left calf pressure ulcer.  The pressure ulcer was avoidable and the resident required an above the knee amputation.  In addition, the resident developed a pressure ulcer on his/her right calf, coccyx, buttocks, and back of head.  The facility failed to adequately assess the resident when s/he developed pressure ulcers and implement additional interventions to minimize the risk of additional pressure ulcer development.

The resident eventually passed away from medical conditions unrelated to the amputation.

Citation Against Thief River Care for a Failure to Perform CPR

In a report concluded on May 11, 2012, the Minnesota Department of Health cites Thief River Care Center Thief River Falls for neglect of health care.

The allegation is neglect based on the following: Staff did not initiate cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) when Resident #1 was found with no pulse or respirations.  Resident #1’s record indicated that CPR should be performed.

What can the Office of Health Facility Complaints Investigate?

  • Complaints relating to quality of life and quality of care at health care facilities/agencies including resident rights concerns.
  • Minnesota licensed facilities: hospitals
  • nursing homes
  • boarding care homes
  • supervised living facilities
  • assisted living and home health agencies
  • Individuals or organizations exempted from licensure per MS 144A.46, Subd. 2.
  • Allegations of child maltreatment in non-licensed personal care provider organizations.
  • Only personal care assistance (PCAs) staff working in home care agencies.

The Minnesota Department of Health Facilities Complaint, OHFC Does Not Investigate:

  • Billing or insurance concerns.
  • Medical clinics.
  • PCAs who do not work for a home care agency.

For more information from the Minnesota Department of Health, Office of Health Facility Complaints concerning nursing homes, assisted living and other elder care providers view resolved complaints at the MDH website.

If you have concerns about, pressure ulcers, amputations, failure to perform CPR or any other form of elder abuse or neglect contact Elder Abuse and Neglect Attorney Kenneth LaBore toll free at 1-888-452-6589 or by email at KLaBore@MNnursinghomeneglect.com.

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Stage IV Pressure Sore Suffered by Resident at the Estates at Bloomington

Written By: Kenneth LaBore | Published On: 19th March 2017 | Category: Pressure Ulcers, Wound Care | RSS Feed

Recent MDH Substantiated Neglect at Estates at Bloomington after neglect – nursing care.

NPUAP Stage 4 Pressure Injury with Epibole - Neglect at Golden Living Center Bloomington AKA the Estates at Bloomington

NPUAP Stage 4 Pressure Injury with Epibole – Neglect at Golden Living Center Bloomington AKA the Estates at Bloomington

Substantiated Neglect After Serious Pressure Sores at the Estates at Bloomington

In a report dated August 25, 2017, the Minnesota Department of Health cited Golden LivingCenter in Bloomington now know as the Estates at Bloomington with neglect after a resident developed a stage IV pressure ulcer at the facility.

Pressure Ulcer Wounds Develop for Resident at the Estates at Bloomington

Based on a preponderance of the evidence, neglect occurred when the facility failed to adequately assess, monitor, and implement interventions to prevent and heal pressure ulcers.  The resident re-developed coccyx/buttocks pressure ulcers, which worsened.

The resident was admitted to the facility with a sacral pressure ulcer.  Staff implemented interventions to prevent the development of additional pressure ulcers.  Over the next several months, the sacral pressure ulcer healed, re-developed, and healed again.  New interventions were implemented; however, the resident’s care plan, and direct care staff aside sheet were not kept up to date with instructions for direct staff on how frequently to turn and reposition the resident.

Approximately two months after the last pressure ulcer healed, the resident developed two stage two pressure ulcers to her/his coccyx/buttocks.  Staff did not notify or obtain orders for treatment from the physician until 28 days later, when the ulcers had worsened and resident had four open areas to her/his buttocks.  One week later, the resident went to the hospital due to a decrease in responsiveness and a temperature of 101.6 degrees Fahrenheit.

According to the records, the hospital admitted the resident with a diagnosis of sepsis as well as a catheter associated urinary tract infection.  Upon admission into the hospital, the resident’s pressure ulcers had necrotic tissue with surrounding skin cellulitis.  The sacral bone was exposed.

When interviewed, the nurse practitioner stated s/he had never previously examined the resident’s pressure ulcers due to resident refusals.  The nurse practitioner was not informed of the pressure ulcers redevelopment until approximately one month after staff observed the new pressure ulcers.  The nurse practitioner indicated the facility’s lack of monitoring, and delay in treatment contributed to the worsening of the resident’s pressure ulcers.

The resident did not return to the facility.

Report Suspected Neglect Pressure Ulcers and Wounds – the Estates at Bloomington

Click Here For Link To Report Abuse To Adult Protection

Click Here For Link To Report Abuse To Adult Protection

For more information from the Minnesota Department of Health, Office of Health Facility Complaints concerning nursing homes, assisted living and other elder care providers view resolved complaints at the MDH website.

If you have concerns about pressure ulcers or any other form of elder abuse or neglect contact Minnesota Elder Abuse Attorney Kenneth LaBore toll free at 612-743-9048 or toll free at 1-888-452-6589 or by email at KLaBore@MNnursinghomeneglect.com.

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Free Consultation on Issues of Elder Abuse and Neglect Serving all of Minnesota Toll Free 1-888-452-6589

Free Consultation on Issues of Elder Abuse and Neglect Serving all of Minnesota Toll Free 1-888-452-6589

 

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Pressure Sore Stages

Written By: Kenneth LaBore | Published On: 3rd February 2017 | Category: Bed Sores and Pressure Ulcers, Patient Lift | RSS Feed

Pressure Sore Stages NPUAP Stage 5, Deep Tissue Pressure Injury

Pressure Sore Stages NPUAP Stage 5, Deep Tissue Pressure Injury

Pressure Sore Stages

Pressure sores stages are categorized into four key stages depending on their age, size, depth and severity. The National Pressure Ulcer Advisory Panel, a professional organization that promotes the prevention and treatment of pressure ulcers, defines each stage.

According to the Mayo Clinic, for people who use a wheelchair, pressure sores often occur on skin over the following sites:

  • Tailbone or buttocks
  • Shoulder blades and spine
  • Backs of arms and legs where they rest against the chair

For people who are confined to a bed, common sites include the following:

  • Back or sides of the head
  • Rim of the ears
  • Shoulders or shoulder blades
  • Hip, lower back or tailbone
  • Heels, ankles and skin behind the knees

Pressure Sore Stages

According to WebMD, pressure sores (bed sores) are an injury to the skin and underlying tissue. They can range from mild reddening of the skin to severe tissue damage-and sometimes infection-that extends into muscle and bone. Pressure sores are described in four stages:

Stage 1 sores are not open wounds. The skin may be painful, but it has no breaks or tears. The skin appears reddened and does not blanch (lose color briefly when you press your finger on it and then remove your finger). In a dark-skinned person, the area may appear to be a different color than the surrounding skin, but it may not look red. Skin temperature is often warmer. And the stage 1 sore can feel either firmer or softer than the area around it.

At stage 2, the skin breaks open, wears away, or forms an ulcer, which is usually tender and painful. The sore expands into deeper layers of the skin. It can look like a scrape (abrasion), blister, or a shallow crater in the skin. Sometimes this stage looks like a blister filled with clear fluid. At this stage, some skin may be damaged beyond repair or may die.

During stage 3, the sore gets worse and extends into the tissue beneath the skin, forming a small crater. Fat may show in the sore, but not muscle, tendon, or bone.

At stage 4, the pressure sore is very deep, reaching into muscle and bone and causing extensive damage. Damage to deeper tissues, tendons, and joints may occur.

In stages 3 and 4 there may be little or no pain due to significant tissue damage. Serious complications, such as infection of the bone (osteomyelitis) or blood (sepsis), can occur if pressure sores progress.

Sometimes a pressure sore does not fit into one of these stages. In some cases, a deep pressure sore is suspected but cannot be confirmed. When there isn’t an open wound but the tissues beneath the surface have been damaged, the sore is called a deep tissue injury (DTI). The area of skin may look purple or dark red, or there may be a blood-filled blister. If you or your doctor suspect a pressure sore, the area is treated as though a pressure sore has formed.

There are also pressure sores that are “unstageable,” meaning that the stage is not clear. In these cases, the base of the sore is covered by a thick layer of other tissue and pus that may be yellow, gray, green, brown, or black. The doctor cannot see the base of the sore to determine the stage.

Pressure Sore Stages Neglect Attorney

If you have questions about nursing home abuse and neglect contact Kenneth LaBore for a free consultation.  There is no fee unless there is a verdict or settlement offer from the wrongdoer.  Mr. LaBore can be reached directly at 612-743-9048 or toll free at 1-888-452-6589 or by email at KLaBore@MNnursinghomeneglect.com.

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Bedsore Injury

Written By: Kenneth LaBore | Published On: 3rd February 2017 | Category: Bed Sores and Pressure Ulcers, Failure to Resond to Change in Condition, Nursing Home Abuse and Neglect, Pressure Ulcers | RSS Feed

Nursing Home Bedsore Injury is Preventable

Nursing Home Bedsore Injury is Preventable

Bedsore Injury Injuries Are Preventable

Bedsore injury is preventable with proper care and treatment and sufficient staff at nursing homes and other elder care facilities to ensure that residents who need assistance are turned and repositioned at least every two hours to assure that they do not have long periods of time without pressure relief.  There are several points of the body that are more prone to bed sore pressure ulcers, including the back of the head, shoulder, buttocks, coccyx, and back of heels.

Bedsore Injury Stages

According to the Mayo Clinic, bedsores fall into one of four stages based on their severity. The National Pressure Ulcer Advisory Panel, a professional organization that promotes the prevention and treatment of pressure ulcers, defines each stage as follows:

Stage 1

The beginning stage of a pressure sore has the following characteristics:

  • The skin is not broken.
  • The skin appears red on people with lighter skin color, and the skin doesn’t briefly lighten (blanch) when touched.
  • On people with darker skin, the skin may show discoloration, and it doesn’t blanch when touched.
    The site may be tender, painful, firm, soft, warm or cool compared with the surrounding skin.

Stage 2

At stage 2:

  • The outer layer of skin (epidermis) and part of the underlying layer of skin (dermis) is damaged or lost.
  • The wound may be shallow and pinkish or red.
  • The wound may look like a fluid-filled blister or a ruptured blister.

Stage 3

At stage 3, the ulcer is a deep wound:

  • The loss of skin usually exposes some fat.
  • The ulcer looks crater-like.
  • The bottom of the wound may have some yellowish dead tissue.
  • The damage may extend beyond the primary wound below layers of healthy skin.

Stage IV

A stage IV ulcer shows large-scale loss of tissue:

  • The wound may expose muscle, bone or tendons.
  • The bottom of the wound likely contains dead tissue that’s yellowish or dark and crusty.
  • The damage often extends beyond the primary wound below layers of healthy skin.

Unstageable

A pressure ulcer is considered unstageable if its surface is covered with yellow, brown, black or dead tissue. It’s not possible to see how deep the wound is.

Deep tissue injury

A deep tissue injury may have the following characteristics:

  • The skin is purple or maroon but the skin is not broken.
  • A blood-filled blister is present.
  • The area is painful, firm or mushy.
  • The area is warm or cool compared with the surrounding skin.
  • In people with darker skin, a shiny patch or a change in skin tone may develop.

Bedsore Injury Skin Care

Residents must receive necessary skin care to help prevent pressure  and bedsore injury.  According to Minnesota Administrative Rule 4658.0520, Subpart (2)(B), clean skin and freedom from offensive odors. A bathing plan must be part of each resident’s plan of care. A resident whose condition requires that the resident remain in bed must be given a complete bath at least every other day and more often as indicated. An incontinent resident must be checked at least every two hours, and must receive perineal care following each episode of incontinence. Clean linens or clothing must be provided promptly each time the bed or clothing is soiled. Perineal care includes the washing and drying of the perineal area. Pads or diapers must be used to keep the bed dry and for the resident’s comfort. Special attention must be given to the skin to prevent irritation. Rubber, plastic, or other types of protectors must be kept clean, be completely covered, and not come in direct contact with the resident. Soiled linen and clothing must be removed immediately from resident areas to prevent odors.

Bedsore Injury Must Be Reported

According to Minnesota Statute 144.7065, each facility shall report to the commissioner the occurrence of any of the adverse health care events described in subdivisions 2 to 7 as soon as is reasonably and practically possible, but no later than 15 working days after discovery of the event. The report shall be filed in a format specified by the commissioner and shall identify the facility but shall not include any identifying information for any of the health care professionals, facility employees, or patients involved. The commissioner may consult with experts and organizations familiar with patient safety when developing the format for reporting and in further defining events in order to be consistent with industry standards.

The statute requires the reporting to the Commissioner of the Department of Health, stage 3 or 4 or unstageable ulcers acquired after admission to a facility, excluding progression from stage 2 to stage 3 if stage 2 was recognized upon admission.

Additional Information on Bedsore Injury

Also see some of my other blogs on this topic:

Bedsore Stages

Pressure Injury Stages

Pressure Sore Injury

Pressure Injuries

Bedsore Injury Neglect Attorney

If you have questions about nursing home abuse and neglect contact Kenneth LaBore for a free consultation.  There is no fee unless there is a verdict or settlement offer from the wrongdoer.  Mr. LaBore can be reached directly at 612-743-9048 or toll free at 1-888-452-6589 or by email at KLaBore@MNnursinghomeneglect.com.

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Pressure Sore Injury

Written By: Kenneth LaBore | Published On: 3rd February 2017 | Category: Bed Sores and Pressure Ulcers, Pressure Ulcers | RSS Feed

Nursing Staff Providing Wound Care for Pressure Sore Injury

Nursing Staff Providing Wound Care for Pressure Sore Injury

Nursing Home Pressure Sore Injury

Residents of nursing homes have a few areas of risk that are the greatest, some like falls, being dropped from lifts, medication mistakes, sexual and physical abuse are obvious forms of neglect.  Pressure sore injury is usually neglect that occurs over a period of time and due to a failure to relieve pressure usually aggravated by other factors such as a lack of nutrition and hydration and issues with sanitation and hygiene in the subject facility.

Pressure Sore Injury is Preventable

According to federal regulations, based on the comprehensive assessment of a resident, the facility must ensure that—

(i) A resident receives care, consistent with professional standards of practice, to prevent pressure ulcers and does not develop pressure ulcers unless the individual’s clinical condition demonstrates that they were unavoidable; and

(ii) A resident with pressure ulcers receives necessary treatment and services, consistent with professional standards of practice, to promote healing, prevent infection and prevent new ulcers from developing.

Pressure Sore Injury to Skin and Underlying Tissue

Picture of Pressure Sore From Healthwise

Picture of Pressure Sore From Healthwise

According to WebMD,pressure sores (bed sores) are an injury to the skin and underlying tissue. They can range from mild reddening of the skin to severe tissue damage-and sometimes infection-that extends into muscle and bone. Pressure sores are described in four stages:

Stage 1 sores are not open wounds. The skin may be painful, but it has no breaks or tears. The skin appears reddened and does not blanch (lose color briefly when you press your finger on it and then remove your finger). In a dark-skinned person, the area may appear to be a different color than the surrounding skin, but it may not look red. Skin temperature is often warmer. And the stage 1 sore can feel either firmer or softer than the area around it.

At stage 2, the skin breaks open, wears away, or forms an ulcer, which is usually tender and painful. The sore expands into deeper layers of the skin. It can look like a scrape (abrasion), blister, or a shallow crater in the skin. Sometimes this stage looks like a blister filled with clear fluid. At this stage, some skin may be damaged beyond repair or may die.

During stage 3, the sore gets worse and extends into the tissue beneath the skin, forming a small crater. Fat may show in the sore, but not muscle, tendon, or bone.

At stage 4, the pressure sore is very deep, reaching into muscle and bone and causing extensive damage. Damage to deeper tissues, tendons, and joints may occur.

Additional Information on Pressure Sore Injury

Also see my other blogs on this topic:

Bedsore Stages

Pressure Injury Stages

Pressure Injuries

Pressure Sore Injury Neglect Attorney

If you have questions about nursing home abuse and neglect contact Kenneth LaBore who has handled dozens of very serious pressure sore and ulcer cases for a free consultation.  There is no fee unless there is a verdict or settlement offer from the wrongdoer.  Mr. LaBore can be reached directly at 612-743-9048 or toll free at 1-888-452-6589 or by email at KLaBore@MNnursinghomeneglect.com.

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Bedsore Stages

Written By: Kenneth LaBore | Published On: 3rd February 2017 | Category: Bed Sores and Pressure Ulcers, Failure to Resond to Change in Condition, Nursing Home Abuse and Neglect, Pressure Ulcers | RSS Feed

Wound Care After Bed Sore Stages Injury

Bedsore Stages of Injury

Bedsore stages is the same as the stages of a pressure injury.  There are many different names for bedsores, including the same word split into bed sore, pressure injuries, pressure sores, pressure ulcer and decubitus ulcer all are a way of explaining skin breakdown which and the related wound which is then set into stages.  All of these wounds are considered preventable in most cases with proper care and treatment.

According to the Mayo clinic, bedsores most often develop on skin that covers bony areas of the body, such as the heels, ankles, hips and tailbone. People most at risk of bedsores are those with a medical condition that limits their ability to change positions, requires them to use a wheelchair or confines them to a bed for a long time.
Bedsores can develop quickly and are often difficult to treat. Several things can help prevent some bedsores and help with healing.

Wound Characteristics Determine Bedsore Stages

The stages of the bedsore injuries is determined on the characteristics of the wound.  To determine the stage of a wound the provider needs to examine and measure the wound and chart related characteristics such as size (length x width x depth), as well as, the color of the skin and surrounding area, smell, texture and other specifics needed to analysis the wounds origin and progress towards healing.

According to Wikipedia, pressure ulcers occur due to pressure applied to soft tissue resulting in completely or partially obstructed blood flow to the soft tissue. Shear is also a cause, as it can pull on blood vessels that feed the skin. Pressure ulcers most commonly develop in individuals who are not moving about, such as those being bedridden or confined to a wheelchair. It is widely believed that other factors can influence the tolerance of skin for pressure and shear, thereby increasing the risk of pressure ulcer development. These factors are protein-calorie malnutrition, microclimate (skin wetness caused by sweating or incontinence), diseases that reduce blood flow to the skin, such as arteriosclerosis, or diseases that reduce the sensation in the skin, such as paralysis or neuropathy. The healing of pressure ulcers may be slowed by the age of the person, medical conditions (such as arteriosclerosis, diabetes or infection), smoking or medications such as anti-inflammatory drugs.

Information About Bedsore Stages

According to St.Luke’s Health System, the stages of pressure sores bedsores is as follows:

Stage 1

The unbroken skin is red and nonblanchable. Note: It may be difficult to determine blanching in darker skin tones. The affected area may differ in color from the surrounding skin.

  • Goal: Prevent further progression of the injury and support blood flow.
  • Implement treatment plan for (Suspected) Deep Tissue Injury.
  • Cleanse and lightly moisturize the skin. Note: Never massage the affected area. This can cause further damage to tissue. Allow the moisturizer to dry before placing any additional pressure on the area.
    Apply protective dressing, if indicated.
  • Evaluate nutritional intake

Stage 2

Partial-thickness skin loss has occurred and the wound bed is red-pink in color. Slough is not present, but a broken or intact serum-filled blister may be evident.

  • Goal: Prevent full-thickness injury and continue to promote healing.
  • Implement treatment plan for previous stages.
  • Apply dressing to keep wound bed moist and promote healing.
  • Protect fragile skin from adhesives.
  • Reevaluate nutritional intake.

Stage 3

Full-thickness skin loss has occurred. Slough may be present. Subcutaneous fat may be visible, but bone, tendon, or muscle are not. Undermining or tunneling may also be present.

  • Goal: Maintain a clean, moist wound bed to prevent infection and promote new tissue growth (granulation).
  • Implement treatment plans for previous stages.
  • Remove dead tissue (debridement), if needed.
  • Absorb drainage.
  • Fill the injury cavity with appropriate dressing.
  • Evaluate the need for nutritional consultation.

Stage 4

Full-thickness skin loss has occurred. Bone, tendon, or muscle is exposed. Slough or eschar may be present, but the base of the wound can be seen. Undermining and tunneling are often present.

  • Goal: Reduce drainage, remove dead tissue, and establish an environment for new tissue growth.
  • Implement treatment plans for previous stages.
  • Report bone involvement.
  • Treat infection with antibiotics, if indicated.
  • Discuss with the healthcare provider whether surgery is needed.

Unstageable

Full-thickness skin loss has occurred. Slough or eschar covers the wound base. The wound depth cannot be determined because of the slough or eschar.

  • Goal: Determine stage, provide moist environment, and prevent further breakdown.
  • Debride the wound. Do not debride the heel unless signs of infection are present.
  • Reassess injury stage once base is visible.
  • Manage pain of injury.
  • Assess for infection.
  • Discuss pressure injury with the healthcare provider.

For more information see pressures injury stages

Worsening Bedsore Stages Neglect Attorney

If you have questions about bedsore injuries nursing home abuse and neglect contact Kenneth LaBore for a free consultation.  There is no fee unless there is a verdict or settlement offer from the wrongdoer.  Mr. LaBore has handled dozens of bed sore and pressure injury cases and can be reached directly at 612-743-9048 or toll free at 1-888-452-6589 or by email at KLaBore@MNnursinghomeneglect.com.

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Pressure Injury Stages

Written By: Kenneth LaBore | Published On: 3rd February 2017 | Category: Bed Sores and Pressure Ulcers, Nursing Home Abuse and Neglect, Pressure Ulcers | RSS Feed

Health-skin-Non-Caucasian, Pressure Injury from NPUAP

Health-skin-Non-Caucasian, Pressure Injury from NPUAP

Pressure Injury Stages Have Many Names

There are names for skin breakdown and deterioration leading to need for pressure injury stages.  Pressure injuries are commonly referred to as “bedsores” sometimes spelled “bed sores” they are medically called decubitus ulcers and as know by many as pressure sores.  No matter the name used these sores are injuries due to excessive amounts of pressure for long periods of time in most cases.  The sores and ulcers occur on pressure points of the body such as the back of the head, shoulders, rear-end and coccyx, and bottom of heals.

Preventable Pressure Injury Stages

According to federal regulations a person who enters a nursing home without a pressure sore should receive proper care and treatment including turning and reposition, proper hydration, nutrition, and hygiene which should prevent ulcers.   The combination of not being turned as you sit in your urine or feces, on already dirty sheets without enough fluids and protein in your body to fight infections heal leads to the perfect situation for large festering and infected sores.  I have seen many cases of sores down to the bone or feel that need amputation after long periods of delay and neglect from care facilities.

Assessment Needed to Determine Pressure Injury Stages

There are sophisticated ways to assess residents of nursing homes and other elder care providers to look specifically for risks including falling, wandering due to confusion, needs assistance with eating and other risks, including skin condition and aggravators for the potential of developing sores.    Interventions should be taken eliminate hazards and risks as much as practicable, including specialized mattresses that reduce occurrences of pressure ulcers, nutritional supplements. medical equipment such as foam splints and boots to help relieve pressure.

One a sore begins it needs to be carefully charted on the characteristics of the wound and the skin surrounding it.  The caregiver and nursing staff needs to look for skin changes from normal skin to open sores and wounds.  Charting needs to include the size in millimeters and centimeters, length x width, x depth.  The color, skin turgor, and other characteristics of the areas surrounding the wound must also be documented.  The goal is to have each aide and caregiver that sees the wound(s) document the status of the wound at that moment in time so a chart or graph can be made to analysis the condition of the wound and determine is it getting worse or better.

NPUAP – Pressure Injury Stages

Ulcers and sores from pressure injury has Stages 1 to 4 and another for wounds that are considered “unstageable” due to dark hardened skin that is over the wound, often necrotic and considered very serious as is the later Stage 3 and 4 sores.  According to the Nation Pressure Ulcer Advisory Panel, NPUAP, an organization focused on the education and research of pressure sores and ulcers who outline the stages of the wounds, Stage 1 is a early wound with a reddened area and Stage 4 is through all the layers of skin and muscle and often bone is revealed.

Pressure Injury Stages Attorney

If you have questions about pressure injury sores or nursing home abuse and neglect contact Kenneth LaBore for a free consultation.  There is no fee unless there is a verdict or settlement offer from the wrongdoer.  Mr. LaBore can be reached directly at 612-743-9048 or toll free at 1-888-452-6589 or by email at KLaBore@MNnursinghomeneglect.com.

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Nursing Home Bedsore Lawyer

Written By: Kenneth LaBore | Published On: 31st January 2017 | Category: Inadequate Staffing/Training, Nursing Home Abuse and Neglect, Pressure Ulcers, Wound Care | RSS Feed

Minnesota Nursing Home Bedsore Lawyer

Minnesota Nursing Home Bedsore Lawyer

Minnesota Nursing Home Bedsore Lawyer

Elder care nursing home bedsore lawyer cases usually involve a pressure sore or ulcer also known as bedsore which started or worsened due to a lack of care.  Disabled residents require assistance with many activities of daily living including in many situations turning and repositioning themselves in bed.  Many pressure sores can be prevented or diminished if there is pressure relief from areas likely to develop wounds such as the back, rear-end/coccyx, and heels.

Often times pressure sores and ulcers occur due to a lack of well trained staff, particularly nursing aides.  According to federal regulations, the facility must have sufficient nursing staff with the appropriate competencies and skills sets to provide nursing and related services to assure resident safety and attain or maintain the highest practicable physical, mental, and psychosocial well-being of each resident, as determined by resident assessments and individual plans of care and considering the number, acuity and diagnoses of the facility’s resident population in accordance with the facility assessment required at §483.70(e).

(a) Sufficient staff. (1) The facility must provide services by sufficient numbers of each of the following types of personnel on a 24-hour basis to provide nursing care to all residents in accordance with resident care plans.

Federal and State Regulations Summary From Nursing Home Bedsore Lawyer

Federal regulations mandate that based on the comprehensive assessment of a resident, the facility must ensure that—

(i) A resident receives care, consistent with professional standards of practice, to prevent pressure ulcers and does not develop pressure ulcers unless the individual’s clinical condition demonstrates that they were unavoidable; and

(ii) A resident with pressure ulcers receives necessary treatment and services, consistent with professional standards of practice, to promote healing, prevent infection and prevent new ulcers from developing.

Minnesota regulation in Statute 144.7065,requires reporting [by the facility to the Commissioner of the Department of Health] of Stage 3 or 4 or Unstageable ulcers acquired after admission to a facility, excluding progression from Stage 2 to Stage 3 if Stage 2 was recognized upon admission.

Nursing Home Bedsore Lawyer Kenneth LaBore

If you have questions about nursing home abuse and neglect and want accountability for preventable bed sores contact Kenneth LaBore for a free consultation.  There is no fee unless there is a verdict or settlement offer from the wrongdoer.  Mr. LaBore can be reached directly at 612-743-9048 or toll free at 1-888-452-6589 or by email at KLaBore@MNnursinghomeneglect.com.

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