Posts Tagged ‘Nursing Home Falls’

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Resident at Cook County Northshore Falls from Lift and Fractures Arm

Written By: Kenneth LaBore | Published On: 21st March 2017 | Category: Fall Injuries, Patient Lift | RSS Feed
Fractures and Other Injuries - Cook County Northshore Resident Falls from Lift and Fractures Arm

Fractures and Other Injuries – Cook County Northshore Resident Falls from Lift and Fractures Arm

Preventable Neglect – Cook County Northshore Resident Falls from Lift and Fractures Arm

In a report dated February 28, 2017, from the Minnesota Department of Health a resident at Cook County Northshore Hospital and Care Center in Grand Marais was neglected with the alleged perpetrator (AP) transferred the resident with the use of a standing lift.  The resident sustained a fractured arm.

Cook County Northshore Substantiated Neglect after Fall with Fracture

Based on a  preponderance of the evidence, neglect occurred when the AP transferred the resident with a mechanical standing lift and did use the seated sling strap that was necessary for a safe transfer.  The resident was injured during the transfer and fractured and arm.

The resident had dementia.  The resident’s care card indicated the resident required one staff to use a standing lift for all transfers.  The resident’s care card instructed staff to use the seated sling strap and leg strap when using the mechanical standing lift with the resident.

After a shower, the AP attempted to transfer the resident from the shower chair to the resident’s wheelchair.  The AP used a standing lift for the transfer.  The AP applied the back strap and the leg strap, but did not secure the seated sling strap.  Before the resident was lowered into the wheelchair, the resident stepped backward off the standing lift platform.  The AP turned the resident’s call light on for help.  A couple minutes passed and no one responded to the call light.  The AP left the resident’s room with the resident on the standing lift.  A couple of minutes later the AP returned with another staff member.  The resident slipped further down in the standing lift.  The back strap caught the resident under the arms.  The resident hung in the lift by the arms.  The resident’s legs were twisted.  The nurse assessed the resident.  The resident had pain in the right arm and bruises.  The resident was transferred to the clinic.  An x-ray was obtained, and the resident had a fracture of the right proximal humerus.

The physician was interviewed and indicated the resident’s injuries were consistent with the events of the transfer.

The alleged perpetrator was interviewed and said s/he was not trained to use the seated sling strap and was not trained to look at the care card before providing care to the resident.  The AP stated the training she received to use the standing lift equipment was done by following another staff member.

Staff interviews and training documents confirmed the AP was not trained to use the resident’s care card, standing lift equipment, and seated sling strap.

Report Suspected Neglect or Quality of Care Issues – Cook County Northshore Hospital

Click Here For Link To Report Abuse To Adult Protection

Click Here For Link To Report Abuse To Adult Protection

For more information from the Minnesota Department of Health, Office of Health Facility Complaints concerning nursing homes, assisted living and other elder care providers view resolved complaints at the MDH website.

Kenneth LaBore has  a love of the Northshore and has a home in the Grand Marais area and is available to meet you in Grand Marais at your convenience.

If you have concerns about falls from Hoyer or other mechanical lifts or any other form of elder abuse or neglect contact Minnesota Elder Abuse Attorney Kenneth LaBore toll free at 612-743-9048 or toll free at 1-888-452-6589 or by email at KLaBore@MNnursinghomeneglect.com.

Disclaimer

Free Consultation on Issues of Elder Abuse and Neglect Serving all of Minnesota Toll Free 1-888-452-6589

Free Consultation on Issues of Elder Abuse and Neglect Serving all of Minnesota Toll Free 1-888-452-6589

 

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Red Wing Health Center Red Wing Neglect Substantiated

Written By: Kenneth LaBore | Published On: 1st March 2017 | Category: Fall Injuries, Financial Exploitation | RSS Feed
Substantiated Allegation of Neglect at Red Wing Health Center After Resident Suffers From Unstageable Pressure Ulcers Stage III/IV Pressure Sores While at the Facility

Substantiated Allegation of Neglect at Red Wing Health Center After Resident Suffers From Unstageable Pressure Ulcers Stage III/IV Pressure Sores While at the Facility

Red Wing Health Center Resident Suffers from Pressure Sores

In a report dated January 23, 2017 the Minnesota Department of Health alleged that a resident at Red Wing Health Center in Red Wing was neglected when s/he developed several unstageable pressure ulcers and Stage III/IV pressure ulcers while s/he was at the facility.

Red Wing Health Center Substantiated Neglect Due to Pressure Ulcers

Based on a preponderance of the evidence, neglect occurred when facility staff failed to implement a resident’s designated care plan interventions to heal pressure ulcers and prevent new ulcers from developing.  Although facility nurses were aware that the resident was resisting the care plan interventions, facility nurses failed to address any alternative approaches for effective wound management.  The resident developed nine new pressure ulcers in four months, including several that became infected and exhibited serious characteristics such as tunneling with depth, exposing muscle and bone.  The resident was hospitalized twice in four months with sepsis from wound infections.

The resident was admitted to the facility from another long-term care facility at the end of April 2016.  At the time of admission, the resident had two pressure ulcers, an unstageable pressure ulcer on the sacrum (2.7 cm x 1.5 cm x .4 cm) and a Stage II pressure ulcer on the right heel (1.8 cm x 1 cm).  The resident has complete paraplegia and multiple sclerosis.  The resident is unable to move his/her legs and has limited use of his/her arms.  The resident can use an electric wheelchair independently which the resident propels with a joy stick.  The resident is alert and oriented.

The resident had an alternating air mattress on his/her bed and a pressure redistributing cushion in the electric wheelchair.  Staff were supposed to turn and re-position the resident every two hours and offload the resident hourly per the resident’s care plan, but these interventions were not carried out.  There was no planned turning or re-positioning schedule for pressure redistribution and staff did not offer to turn or reposition the resident unless the resident requested it.  The resident was expected to offload him/herself by reclining the backrest of the wheelchair, but the frequency of offloading was not monitored by staff.  The nursing assistant care guides regarding the resident’s daily care tasks were void of any interventions aimed at wound management, including turning, re-positioning, or offloading the resident.  Nurses did not provide adequate oversight of the resident’s daily care by nursing assistants or the resident’s daily needs to heal wounds and prevent new wounds from developing.

Although staff stated that the resident consistently refused wound management interventions, there was no evidence that staff evaluated the inadequacy of interventions of assessed the resident’s individualized needs for alternative interventions.  At the end of June 2016, the resident was hospitalized with sepsis due to a sacral wound infection.  The sacral pressure ulcer had deteriorated to Stage IV with exposed muscle and Stage II pressure ulcer on the right hip (10 cm in diameter), a Stage II pressure ulcer on the left hip (6 cm in diameter), a Stage II pressure ulcer on the left ischium (2 cm x 2 cm), and a Stage II pressure ulcer on the right ischium (2 cm x 2 cm).

After the resident returned to the facility from the hospital, there was no evidence that staff re-evaluated the resident’s care plan interventions to determine modifications necessary for wound management and skin integrity.  There was no evidence that staff initiated structured care interventions, including possible behavioral strategies, to promote wound healing and prevent new skin breakdown.

In mid-September 2016, the resident was hospitalized again with sepsis due to wound infections.  On hospital admission, the resident had eleven pressure ulcers.  Four of eleven pressure ulcers had grossly deteriorated.  The sacral pressure ulcer (12 cm x 10 cm) was unstageable with purulent foul drainage and macerated edges.  The left hip pressure ulcer was unstageable (9 cm x 7 cm) with purulent foul drainage.  The right hip pressure ulcer had deteriorated to Stage IV (12 cm x 12 cm 1.5 cm) with bone felt at the bottom of the wound bed.  The right ischium pressure ulcer had deteriorated to Stage IV (6 cm 5 cm 6 cm) with muscle exposed.  The resident also had seven additional pressure ulcers, including Stage III pressure ulcer on the left lateral ankle (3.5 cm x 2.0 cm), five pressure ulcers classified as unstageable on the right posterior shoulder (5.0 cm x 4.0 cm), the right heel (2.0 cm x 2.0 cm x 2.5 cm), the left heel (2.2 cm x 1.2 cm), the left lateral foot (1.0 cm x 1.5 cm), the right medical ankle (1.3 cm 0.7 cm), and a Stage I pressure ulcer on the right lateral ankle.  The resident was hospitalized for eight days due to the seriousness of the wounds.

After the resident returned to the facility from the hospital, there was no evidence that staff re-evaluated the resident’s care approaches or made any changes in the resident’s daily care routine.  At the time of the onsite investigation, staff were not turning, repositioning, or offloading the resident and the Nurse Manager of the resident’s until did not know how many wounds the resident had, what the condition of the resident’s wounds were, or what the care plan interventions were to heal the resident’s wounds and prevent new wounds from developing.

Red Wing Health Center – Report Abuse and Neglect

Click Here For Link To Report Abuse To Adult Protection

Click Here For Link To Report Abuse To Adult Protection

For more information from the Minnesota Department of Health, Office of Health Facility Complaints concerning nursing homes, assisted living and other elder care providers view resolved complaints at the MDH website.

Hold Negligent Providers Like Red Wing Health Center Accountable

Attorney Kenneth LaBore has handled many preventable serious and fatal burn injuries, many due to the failure to follow safety policies and procedures related to oxygen use and smoking.    Burns can also happen from scalding water, heaters and electric pads and blankets and other ways.

If you have concerns about pressure sore injuries or any other form of elder abuse or neglect contact Minnesota Elder Abuse Attorney Kenneth LaBore toll free at 612-743-9048 or toll free at 1-888-452-6589 or by email at KLaBore@MNnursinghomeneglect.com.

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Free Consultation on Issues of Elder Abuse and Neglect Serving all of Minnesota Toll Free 1-888-452-6589

Free Consultation on Issues of Elder Abuse and Neglect Serving all of Minnesota Toll Free 1-888-452-6589

 

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Physical Abuse by Staff

Physical Abuse by Staff Heritage House of Milaca Minnesota

Heritage House of Milaca Complaint Findings for Exploitation

In a report concluded on January 31, 2011, the Minnesota Department of Health cites Heritage House of Milaca for exploitation by staff.

The allegation is abused based on the following:  Employee (A), alleged perpetrator (AP) grabbed Client #1’s wrist causing bruising on Client #1’s hand and wrist.

Substantiated Complaint Against Heritage House of Milaca

According to the National Center on Elder Abuse, elder abuse is a growing problem. While we don’t know all of the details about why abuse occurs or how to stop its spread, we do know that help is available for victims. Concerned people, like you, can spot the warning signs of a possible problem, and make a call for help if an elder is in need of assistance.

•Physical Abuse
•Sexual Abuse
•Emotional or Psychological Abuse
•Neglect
•Abandonment
•Financial or Material Exploitation
•Self-neglect

For more information from the Minnesota Department of Health, Office of Health Facility Complaints concerning nursing homes, assisted living and other elder care providers view resolved complaints at the MDH website.

If you have concerns about financial exploitation or any other form of elder abuse or neglect contact Minnesota Elder Abuse Attorney Kenneth LaBore at 612-743-9048 or toll free at 1-888-452-6589 or by email at KLaBore@MNnursinghomeneglect.com.

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Wheelchair Injury Fall

Wheelchair Injury Fall Red Wing Health Center Red Wing Minnesota

Red Wing Health Center Cited for Abuse – Exploitation – Drug Diversion

In a report dated February 4, 2016, the Minnesota Department of Health cited Red Wing Health Center alleged that a resident was financially exploited when a staff, alleged perpetrator (AP) took a resident’s pain medication for his/her own personal use.

Based on a preponderance of the evidence financial exploitation did occur when the alleged perpetrator (AP) took 39 oxycodone (a narcotic) tablets from the resident for his/her own personal use over a period of approximately a month.

Red Wing Health Center Red Wing Complaint Findings for Neglect – Falls

In a report concluded on April 26, 2012, the Minnesota Department of Health cites Red Wing Health Center Red Wing for neglect of health care -falls.

The allegation is neglect based on the following: Resident #1 had a fall, with serious injuries, when Employee (J)/Alleged Perpetrator (AP) placed Resident #1 in the wrong wheelchair, which did not have a pressure alarm or self-release seat belt.

For more information from the Minnesota Department of Health, Office of Health Facility Complaints concerning nursing homes, assisted living and other elder care providers view resolved complaints at the MDH website.

If you have concerns about falls, fractures, financial exploitation or any other form of elder abuse or neglect contact Elder Abuse and Neglect Attorney Kenneth LaBore toll free at 1-888-452-6589 or by email at KLaBore@MNnursinghomeneglect.com.

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Shakopee Friendship Manor Shakopee

Written By: Kenneth LaBore | Published On: 22nd February 2017 | Category: Fall Injuries, Patient Lift | RSS Feed
Shakopee Friendship Manor Shakopee Resident Suffers Head Injuries After Fall During Transfer From Mechanical Lift

Shakopee Friendship Manor Shakopee Resident Suffers Head Injuries After Fall During Transfer From Mechanical Lift

Shakopee Friendship Manor Shakopee Neglect After Fall From Patient Lift

In a report dated, January 26, 2017, the Minnesota Department of Health alleged that a resident at Shakopee Friendship Manor Shakopee was neglected when the resident fell from a mechanical lift from the height of his/her bed and sustained an injury on his/her head.

Shakopee Friendship Manor Shakopee Neglect Substantiated After Injuries From Resident Being Dropped From Mechanical Lift

The report states, based on a preponderance of evidence, the resident was neglected when s/he fell from the mechanical lift and sustained a laceration to his/her head requiring stitches.  Although the staff members involved stated they used the lift in the manner they were trained, the sling became detached from the lift and the resident fell from the sling.  No maintenance records for the lift could be located.

Medical record review revealed the resident was admitted to the facility with diagnoses that included osteoarthritis and chronic pain.  The resident’s care plan indicated the resident was to be transferred with the maximum assistance of 2 staff and mechanical lift.  (A mechanical lift is mechanical lift device that uses a sling and device to lift a resident and move them from one surface to another such as from a bed to a chair.

Staff interviews revealed on 9/7/2016 two staff members, AP1 and AP2, were getting the resident out of the bed using a mechanical lift.  During the lift, the resident fell out of the lift sling.  Staff members stated they attached the sling to the lift in the usual manner and lifted the resident off the bed.  When moving resident to the wheelchair, the wheels on the lift caught and staff had to push the lift hard to get it to move.  During the transfer the resident slid out of the sling head first to the floor.  After the resident fell to the floor, staff observed the sling was attached by only 3 of the 4 attachments points.  Staff stated the wheels on the lift had been sticking, and staff told maintenance about the issue, but the problem continued.  Staff call 911 and sent the resident to the hospital for evaluation after the fall.

The hospital record revealed the resident was evaluated in the hospital, received stitches to a laceration to his/her head, but CT scan and X-Rays were negative for fracture or further injury.  The resident went back to the facility the next day with his/her pain controlled with oral medication.

During an interview, the resident’s stated s/he fell when staff were trying to help him/her get up.  The resident stated s/he is getting better, but still has some pain related to injuries sustained in the fall.

During an interview, the resident’s family member stated facility staff informed him/her of the resident’s fall from the lift,  but s/he did not know a lot of details of what happened.  The resident went to the hospital after the fall and had four stiches to his/her head.  The resident is feeling better now, and did not break any bones.

During interviews, maintenance staff stated the lift involved in the incident had been discarded and was not available for observation.  Maintenance staff stated they received a concern related to the sticking wheels on the lift in July 2016, but they were not able to identify which lift needed repair, because was no consistent way to identify the lifts in use at the facility.  In July 2016, they lubricated and cleaned the wheels on all the lifts and the lifts seemed to be functioning correctly at that time.  Maintenance staff stated they had no documentation of the maintenance done on the lift in question, because the maintenance staff use different descriptions of the lifts than the nursing assistant staff.  Maintenance staff have to walk around and try to ask staff which lift they are referring to when they get a concern.  Maintenance provide a monthly cleaning, dusting and oiling of the lifts, but this is not documented.

Manufacturers recommendations for maintenance of the lift includes regularly checking all areas of the lift including the hanger assembly, all bolts, cotter pins, sling hanger/spreader bar meet points, hanger spreader wear points, hooks, mounting bolts, actuator, emergency stop switch, emergency lowering feature, anti-pinch feature, wheels and brakes, and every six months use a test load to check for unusual sounds/noises and check and welds for cracks.

Shakopee Friendship Manor Shakopee – Report Suspected Abuse and Neglect

Click Here For Link To Report Abuse To Adult Protection

Click Here For Link To Report Abuse To Adult Protection

For more information from the Minnesota Department of Health, Office of Health Facility Complaints concerning nursing homes, assisted living and other elder care providers view resolved complaints at the MDH website.

If you have concerns about financial exploitation or any other form of elder abuse or neglect contact Minnesota Elder Abuse Attorney Kenneth LaBore toll free at 612-743-9048 or toll free at 1-888-452-6589 or by email at KLaBore@MNnursinghomeneglect.com.

Disclaimer

Free Consultation on Issues of Elder Abuse and Neglect Serving all of Minnesota Toll Free 1-888-452-6589

Free Consultation on Issues of Elder Abuse and Neglect Serving all of Minnesota Toll Free 1-888-452-6589

 

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Cologne Nursing Home Abuse Lawyers

Written By: Kenneth LaBore | Published On: 20th February 2017 | Category: Abuse and Neglect Attorney | RSS Feed
Protect Vulnerable Adults From Injury - Cologne Nursing Home Abuse Lawyers Kenneth LaBore and Suzanne Scheller

Protect Vulnerable Adults From Injury – Cologne Nursing Home Abuse Lawyers Kenneth LaBore and Suzanne Scheller

Cologne Nursing Home Abuse Lawyers

Attorneys Kenneth LaBore, Esq. and Suzanne Scheller, Esq. have separate firms but work together on many serious injury elder abuse and neglect and wrongful death cases splitting the contingent fee at no additional expense to the client.  Neither attorney is paid unless they win a verdict or get a settlement offered by  the wrongdoer.  Nursing home neglect and abuse cases are complicated claims and often involve allegations which require expert witness support and use of wrongful death statutes.   Mr. LaBore and Ms. Scheller only handle cases with very serious injury, assault or death.  They work hard to get accountability from facilities and to ensure as much as possible that policy and procedure and other changes including training are made to protect residents still in the facility.

We represent clients and their families throughout the state of Minnesota and will come to meet with you if you are unable to meet in one of our offices.

Cologne Nursing Home Abuse Lawyers – Providers

To find a nursing home provider in Minnesota you can check the Minnesota Department of Health website for information on licensure of potential facilities, finding a facility, including complaint history, state survey reportsresident bill of rights, Minnesota Nursing Home Report Card, CMS Medicare Five Star Rating system under Nursing Home Compare and more information related to nursing home and elder care providers.

To check for the updated list of providers in Minneapolis see Minnesota Department of Health Provider lookup.

For more information on selecting a nursing home see Choosing a Facility.

Cologne Nursing Home Abuse Lawyers – Facilities in Cologne

We can investigate and handle cases against Cologne area facilities as well as other elder care providers in Carver County and throughout the state of Minnesota.

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Cologne Nursing Home Abuse and Neglect Attorney Kenneth LaBore

Kenneth LaBore is a Minnesota Attorney who knows how to fight and hold negligent nursing homes accountable. Mr. LaBore is a skilled investigative trial attorney with well over two decades of experience who represents victims and family members in cases involving nursing home elder negligence and abuse.

For information about nursing home nursing home Medicaid Survey inspection findings see “survey findings”.

Cologne Nursing Home Abuse Lawyers – Report Suspected Abuse

Pursuant to Minn. Statute 144.7065, Subd. 7, potential criminal events, events reportable under this subdivision are:

(1) any instance of care ordered by or provided by someone impersonating a physician, nurse, pharmacist, or other licensed health care provider;
(2) abduction of a patient of any age;
(3) sexual assault on a patient within or on the grounds of a facility; and
(4) death or serious injury of a patient or staff member resulting from a physical assault that occurs within or on the grounds of a facility.

In addition to the reporting requirements for the facility you should also report any physical or sexual abuse to the local police department and the Minnesota Department of Health Office of Health Facility Complaint, OHFC.  See the attached for more information about reporting elder abuse and neglect.

Click Here For Link To Report Abuse To Adult Protection

Click Here For Link To Report Abuse To Adult Protection

The Minnesota Department of Health MDH, Office of Health Facility Complaints, OHFC, protects the identity of the person making the complaint and the mistreated patient or resident. Serious questions of health or safety are investigated within two business days.

Cologne Nursing Home Abuse Lawyers Kenneth LaBore and Suzanne Scheller

If you have concerns about nursing home or assisted living elder abuse and neglect injuries and you are interested in a free consultation to discuss your case call Kenneth LaBore at 612-743-9048 or toll free at 1-888-452-6589 or by email at KLaBore@MNnursinghomeneglect.com.  If the elder neglect and abuse case is accepted you would have two experienced lawyers fighting for accountability on your behalf.

Disclaimer

Free Consultation on Issues of Elder Abuse and Neglect Serving all of Minnesota Toll Free 1-888-452-6589

Free Consultation on Issues of Elder Abuse and Neglect Serving all of Minnesota Toll Free 1-888-452-6589

 

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Plymouth Nursing Home Abuse Lawyers

Written By: Kenneth LaBore | Published On: 6th February 2017 | Category: Elder Physical Abuse, Nursing Home Abuse and Neglect, Sexual Abuse, Wrongful Death | RSS Feed
Plymouth Nursing Home Abuse Lawyers Kenneth LaBore and Suzanne Scheller

Plymouth Nursing Home Abuse Lawyers Kenneth LaBore and Suzanne Scheller

Plymouth Nursing Home Abuse Lawyers

Attorneys Kenneth LaBore, Esq. and Suzanne Scheller, Esq. have separate firms but work together on many serious injury elder abuse and neglect and wrongful death cases splitting the contingent fee at no additional expense to the client.  Neither attorney is paid unless they win a verdict or get a settlement offered by  the wrongdoer.  Nursing home neglect and abuse cases are complicated claims and often involve allegations which require expert witness support and use of wrongful death statutes.   Mr. LaBore and Ms. Scheller only handle cases with very serious injury, assault or death.  They work hard to get accountability from facilities and to ensure as much as possible that policy and procedure and other changes including training are made to protect residents still in the facility.

We represent clients and their families throughout the state of Minnesota and will come to meet with you if you are unable to meet in one of our offices.

Plymouth Nursing Home Abuse Lawyers – Providers

To find a nursing home provider in Minnesota you can check the Minnesota Department of Health website for information on licensure of potential facilities, finding a facility, including complaint history, state survey reportsresident bill of rights, Minnesota Nursing Home Report Card, CMS Medicare Five Star Rating system under Nursing Home Compare and more information related to nursing home and elder care providers.

To check for the updated list of providers in Minneapolis see Minnesota Department of Health Provider lookup.

For more information on selecting a nursing home see Choosing a Facility.

Plymouth Nursing Home Abuse Lawyers – Facilities in Plymouth

We can investigate and handle cases against these Plymouth facilities as well as others in Hennepin County and throughout the state of Minnesota:

Name: INTERLUDE
Address: 2775 CAMPUS DRIVE NORTH
PLYMOUTH,  MN  55441
Phone: 763-577-3400   Fax: 763-577-3401
Administrator: MR. GREG BAUMBERGER
Minnesota Licensed Bed Capacity: (Nursing Home Beds = 50)
Federally Certified Beds: (Dual Medicare/Medicaid Skilled Nursing and Nursing Facility Beds = 50)

Name: MISSION NURSING HOME
Address: 3401 EAST MEDICINE LAKE BLVD
PLYMOUTH,  MN  55441
Phone: 763-559-3123   Fax: 763-559-0604
Administrator: MR. TIMOTHY MEYER
Minnesota Licensed Bed Capacity: (Nursing Home Beds = 97)
Federally Certified Beds: (Dual Medicare/Medicaid Skilled Nursing and Nursing Facility Beds = 97)

Name: TRILLIUM WOODS
Address: 14585 59TH AVENUE NORTH
PLYMOUTH,  MN  55446
Phone: 763-744-9400   Fax: 763-559-1799
Administrator: MS. ELIZABETHANN FETNER
Minnesota Licensed Bed Capacity: (Nursing Home Beds = 44)
Federally Certified Beds: (Dual Medicare/Medicaid Skilled Nursing and Nursing Facility Beds = 44)

For more information about nursing home facility MDH Complaints see “facilities”.

For more information about nursing home nursing home Medicaid Survey inspection findings see “survey findings”.

Plymouth Nursing Home Abuse Lawyers – Report Suspected Abuse

Pursuant to Minn. Statute 144.7065, Subd. 7, potential criminal events, events reportable under this subdivision are:

(1) any instance of care ordered by or provided by someone impersonating a physician, nurse, pharmacist, or other licensed health care provider;
(2) abduction of a patient of any age;
(3) sexual assault on a patient within or on the grounds of a facility; and
(4) death or serious injury of a patient or staff member resulting from a physical assault that occurs within or on the grounds of a facility.

In addition to the reporting requirements for the facility you should also report any physical or sexual abuse to the local police department and the Minnesota Department of Health Office of Health Facility Complaint, OHFC.  See the attached for more information about reporting elder abuse and neglect.

The Minnesota Department of Health MDH, Office of Health Facility Complaints, OHFC, protects the identity of the person making the complaint and the mistreated patient or resident. Serious questions of health or safety are investigated within two business days.

Plymouth Nursing Home Abuse Lawyers Kenneth LaBore and Suzanne Scheller

If you have concerns about nursing home or assisted living elder abuse and neglect injuries and you are interested in a free consultation to discuss your case call Kenneth LaBore at 612-743-9048 or toll free at 1-888-452-6589 or by email at KLaBore@MNnursinghomeneglect.com.  Mr. LaBore can also be reached at 1-888-452-6569.  If the elder neglect and abuse case is accepted you would have two lawyers fighting for accountability on your behalf.

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Falls From Bed in Nursing Homes

Written By: Kenneth LaBore | Published On: 30th January 2017 | Category: Bed Rail Strangulation and Asphyxiation, Fall Injuries, Hoyer Lift, Nursing Home Abuse and Neglect, Patient Lift, Wrongful Death | RSS Feed
Nursing Home Injuries Falls From Bed

Nursing Home Injuries Falls From Bed

Falls From Bed

There are many injuries which happen in areas you would think you are safe such as in bed. It is not uncommon for vulnerable adults such as nursing home residents to have falls from bed from rolling out of bed, or losing their balance exiting or entering bed. Serious injuries can occur from falling from the bed and hitting the bed, floor or nightstand or other obstacle near the bed such as a table or oxygen tank. Residents can suffer femur and hip fractures, and other life threatening injuries such as head injuries with hematomas.  Many accident also happen when residents are transferred from wheelchairs to bed or from mechanical patient lifts to and from beds and lose balance or fall from the lift.

Approximately 1.8 million emergency room visits and over 400 thousand hospital admission occur to those over the age of 65 resulted from falling out of bed according to the Center for Disease Control.

Falls From Bed Can Be Prevented

Pursuant to 42 CFR 483.25, quality of care is a fundamental principle that applies to all treatment and care provided to facility residents. Based on the comprehensive assessment of a resident, the facility must ensure that residents receive treatment and care in accordance with professional standards of practice, the comprehensive person-centered care plan, and the resident’s choices, including but not limited to the following:

(d) Accidents.  The facility must ensure that—

(1) The resident environment remains as free of accident hazards as is possible; and

(2) Each resident receives adequate supervision and assistance devices to prevent accidents.

(n) Bed rails.  The facility must attempt to use appropriate alternatives prior to installing a side or bed rail. If a bed or side rail is used, the facility must ensure correct installation, use, and maintenance of bed rails, including but not limited to the following elements.

(1) Assess the resident for risk of entrapment from bed rails prior to installation.

(2) Review the risks and benefits of bed rails with the resident or resident representative and obtain informed consent prior to installation.

(3) Ensure that the bed’s dimensions are appropriate for the resident’s size and weight.

(4) Follow the manufacturers’ recommendations and specifications for installing and maintaining bed rails.

Pursuant to Minnesota Statute 144.7056, Subdivision 1., each facility shall report to the commissioner the occurrence of any of the adverse health care events described in subdivisions 2 to 7 as soon as is reasonably and practically possible, but no later than 15 working days after discovery of the event. The report shall be filed in a format specified by the commissioner and shall identify the facility but shall not include any identifying information for any of the health care professionals, facility employees, or patients involved. The commissioner may consult with experts and organizations familiar with patient safety when developing the format for reporting and in further defining events in order to be consistent with industry standards.

Minnesota Statute 144,7065, Subd. 5., mandates reporting under care management events. Events reportable under this subdivision (7) patient death or serious injury associated with a fall while being cared for in a facility

Attorney For Falls From Bed

I you have questions about nursing home abuse and neglect and fractures or other fall related injuries contact Kenneth LaBore for a free consultation.  There is no fee unless there is a verdict or settlement offer from the wrongdoer.  Mr. LaBore can be reached directly at 612-743-9048 or toll free at 1-888-452-6589 or by email at KLaBore@MNnursinghomeneglect.com.

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Falls In Shower in Nursing Home

Written By: Kenneth LaBore | Published On: 30th January 2017 | Category: Fall Injuries, Grab Bars, Nursing Home Abuse and Neglect, Patient Lift, Wrongful Death | RSS Feed
Falls in Shower in Nursing Homes, Assisted Living and Memory Care Facilities

Falls in Shower in Nursing Homes, Assisted Living and Memory Care Facilities

Falls In Shower Need to Be Prevented

Nursing homes are required by federal law to provide each resident with care and services based on their individual needs.  Nursing homes must provide assistance with toileting, bathing, hygiene routines such as bathing or showering as needed.

According to 42 CFR 483.24, quality of life is a fundamental principle that applies to all care and services provided to facility residents. Each resident must receive and the facility must provide the necessary care and services to attain or maintain the highest practicable physical, mental, and psychosocial well-being, consistent with the resident’s comprehensive assessment and plan of care.

(b) Activities of daily living. The facility must provide care and services in accordance with paragraph (a) of this section for the following activities of daily living:

(1) Hygiene—bathing, dressing, grooming, and oral care,

(2) Mobility—transfer and ambulation, including walking,

(3) Elimination—toileting,

(4) Dining—eating, including meals and snacks,

(5) Communication, including

(i) Speech,
(ii) Language,
(iii) Other functional communication systems.

Injuries From Falls In Shower

There are many common ways that falls happen related to showering and bathing in an elder care facility.  Often the resident has some form of physical or cognitive disability and needs assistance of staff and perhaps of mechanical devices to lift or support such as a shower chair.  Many of the injuries are serious and result in lacerations and cuts, head injuries, fractured bones such as femurs, hip joints and pelvis, and other injuries that result in disability or death to the resident.

Information about Falls in Shower

According to the Center for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), in 2008, approximately 21.8 million persons aged ≥15 years sustained nonfatal, unintentional injuries, resulting in approximately $67.3 billion in lifetime medical costs. Information about where injuries occur is limited, but bathrooms commonly are believed to be a particularly hazardous location. To investigate this assumption, CDC analyzed data from a nationally representative sample of emergency departments (EDs) to describe the incidence and circumstances of nonfatal injuries in bathrooms (in any setting) among persons aged ≥15 years in the United States. This report describes the results of that investigation, which found that, based on 3,339 cases documented in the 2008 National Electronic Surveillance System All Injury Program (NEISS-AIP) database, an estimated 234,094 nonfatal bathroom injuries were treated in U.S. EDs. Injury rates increased with age, and most injuries (81.1%) were caused by falls. All persons, but especially older adults, should be aware of bathroom activities that are associated with a high risk for injury and of environmental modifications that might reduce that risk.

The highest rates were for injuries that occurred in or around the tub or shower (65.8 per 100,000) and injuries that happened on or near the toilet (22.5 per 100,000). The precipitating events in 37.3% of injuries were bathing (excluding slipping while bathing), showering, or getting out of the tub or shower; only 2.2% occurred while getting into the tub or shower. The precipitating event for 17.3% of injuries was slipping, which included slipping while bathing; 14.1% occurred when standing up from, sitting down on, or using the toilet; and 5.5% were attributed to an antecedent loss of consciousness.

The CDC article on bathroom fall injuries continues, injury rates increased with age, especially those that occurred on or near the toilet, which increased from 4.1 per 100,000 among persons aged 15–24 years to 266.6 among persons aged ≥85 years. Injuries occurring in or around the tub or shower also increased markedly, from 49.7 per 100,000 among persons aged 15–24 years to 200.2 among persons aged ≥85 years. Within each 10-year age category, the relative proportion of injuries differed by location within the bathroom. The proportion of injuries in or around the tub or shower was highest among persons aged 15–24 years (84.5%) and lowest among persons aged ≥85 years (38.9%), whereas the proportion of injuries that happened on or near the toilet was lowest among persons aged 15–24 years (7.0%) and highest among persons aged ≥85 years (51.7%).

In addition to falls in shower there are also other serious injuries which can occur in the bathroom including scalding burns from hot water in the shower or at the sink.

Falls in Shower Neglect Attorney

If you have questions about nursing home abuse and neglect and fractures or other fall related injuries contact Kenneth LaBore for a free consultation.  There is no fee unless there is a verdict or settlement offer from the wrongdoer.  Mr. LaBore can be reached directly at 612-743-9048 or toll free at 1-888-452-6589 or by email at KLaBore@MNnursinghomeneglect.com.

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Minnesota Nursing Home Neglect Falls

Written By: Kenneth LaBore | Published On: 29th January 2017 | Category: Fall Injuries, Hoyer Lift, Nursing Home Abuse and Neglect, Patient Lift, Wrongful Death | RSS Feed
Minnesota Nursing Home Neglect Falls Fracrtured Femur, Pelvis and Head Injuries

Minnesota Nursing Home Neglect Falls Fracrtured Femur, Pelvis and Head Injuries

Nursing Home Neglect Falls

There many ways in which preventable falls occur in nursing homes, there are falls that happen when a resident is not given the assistance they need in walking or transfers and end up losing strength and balance and then fall.  Loss of balance also leads to falls in the bathroom and when dressing.  There are also falls when residents are not placed in a wheelchair or chair properly, or the wrong size chair and they slide out and injure themselves.  Many falls happen when a resident is dropped from a Hoyer type patient lift or slips out of a improperly attached sling.  Falls in nursing homes lead to many types of serious injury including fractured hips, pelvic and femur fractures, and head injuries many with subdural hematomas.

Preventing Nursing Home Neglect Falls

According the Center for Disease Control and Prevention, CDC, there are causes for fall in nursing homes:

  • Muscle weakness and walking or gait problems are the most common causes of falls among nursing home residents. These problems account for about 24% of the falls in nursing homes.
  • Environmental hazards in nursing homes cause 16% to 27% of falls among residents.
  • Such hazards include wet floors, poor lighting, incorrect bed height, and improperly fitted or maintained wheelchairs.
  • Medications can increase the risk of falls and fall-related injuries. Drugs that affect the central nervous system, such as sedatives and anti-anxiety drugs, are of particular concern. Fall risk is significantly elevated during the three days following any change in these types of medications.
  • Other causes of falls include difficulty in moving from one place to another (for example, from the bed to a chair), poor foot care, poorly fitting shoes, and improper or incorrect use of walking aids.

According to the CDC, each year, millions of older people—those 65 and older—fall. In fact, more than one out of four older people falls each year, but less than half tell their doctor.  Falling once doubles your chances of falling again.

Falls Are Serious and Costly:

  • One out of five falls causes a serious injury such as broken bones or a head injury.
  • Each year, 2.8 million older people are treated in emergency departments for fall injuries.
  • Over 800,000 patients a year are hospitalized because of a fall injury, most often because of a head injury or hip fracture.
  • Each year at least 300,000 older people are hospitalized for hip fractures.
  • More than 95% of hip fractures are caused by falling, usually by falling sideways.
  • Falls are the most common cause of traumatic brain injuries (TBI).
    Adjusted for inflation, the direct medical costs for fall injuries are $31 billion annually.  Hospital costs account for two-thirds of the total.

Mandated Reporting of Nursing Home Neglect Falls

According to Minnesota law requiring mandated reporting for health care providers nursing homes must report to the state pursuant to Minnesota Statute 144.7065, Subd 5.(7) patient death or serious injury associated with a fall while being cared for in a facility.

Nursing Home Neglect Falls Attorney

If you have questions about nursing home abuse and neglect and fractures or other fall related injuries contact Kenneth LaBore for a free consultation.  There is no fee unless there is a verdict or settlement offer from the wrongdoer.  Mr. LaBore can be reached directly at 612-743-9048 or toll free at 1-888-452-6589 or by email at KLaBore@MNnursinghomeneglect.com.

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Fractures from Falls in Minnesota Elder Care Facilities

Written By: Kenneth LaBore | Published On: 29th January 2017 | Category: Fall Injuries, Hoyer Lift, Inadequate Staffing/Training, Nursing Home Abuse and Neglect, Patient Lift, Wrongful Death | RSS Feed

Head Injury, Arm Fracture, Hip Fracture, Femur Fracture, Subdural Hematoma, Hip Fractures from Falls

Head Injury, Arm Fracture, Hip Fracture, Femur Fracture, Subdural Hematoma, Hip Fractures from Falls

Fractures From Falls in Nursing Homes

Many of the fractures from falls in nursing homes and other care settings are preventable had the resident received proper supervision or had their been adequate numbers of well trained staff to perform tasks such as transfers from wheelchairs and chairs, toileting, and assessment related to falls from the bed.   Fractures can be very serious and due to complications can often lead to permanent injuries and disabilities or death.

Fractures From Falls From Patient Lift

Fractures From Falls From Patient Lift

Fractures From Falls From Hoyer Type Mechanical Patient Lift

One of the higher risk situations for residents of nursing homes or other elder care facilities is patient transfer from bed to wheelchair, wheelchair to bed or toilet and other transfers.   The use of a mechanical patient lift can assist with these transfer when done safely but can lead to serious injuries when not performed correctly.  Many times accident are due to the lifts not being used or set up as directed by the manufacturer.   Another reason is the failure to use the right size or proper type of sling for the patient lift.   Many falls occur when the sling is not attached to the lift clips per directions.

Nursing Home and Elder Injuries and Fractures as a Result of Wheelchairs

Nursing Home and Elder Injuries and Fractures as a Result of Wheelchairs

Fractures From Falls From Wheelchairs and Chairs

Injuries from wheelchair and even reclining chairs are common in senior care environments.  The injuries usually occur due to a wheelchair tips over on ramps or curbs, falls down stairs, allows the resident to slip out of the chair, the resident’s feet are allowed to drag causing leg and feet injuries and others.  Residents must receive the supervision and care necessary to avoid injuries including wheelchair falls and injuries.

Nursing Home Injuries Due to Falls in Bathrooms

Nursing Home Injuries Due to Falls in Bathrooms

Fractures From Falls In Bathroom

The bathroom is an area where many types of injuries occur.  Fall injuries related to a loss of balance when setting down or getting up from the toilet.  Injuries from lifts on the toilet or in the shower.  Injuries from slipping in the shower or entering bath or shower.   Injuries also occur when dressing and undressing for baths and showering.  Most injuries in the bathroom are preventable if the resident receives the patient assistance and supervision necessary to provide for their toileting and hygiene needs.

Nursing Home Falls from Bed Can Lead to Serious InjuryFractures and Death

Nursing Home Falls from Bed Can Lead to Serious Injury Fractures and Death

Fractures From Falls From Bed

Although it may seem like someone is safe in their bed, vulnerable nursing home residents suffer serious fractures, head injuries and others when they fall from their bed onto the floor or hit their head or body on items near the bed such as oxygen tanks and night stands.  Many of the injuries as result of falling from bed are preventable, however, nursing homes often refuse or negligently fail to provide bed rails, lower the bed height, provide safety mats or other safety interventions to protect residents at risk of falls.

Fractures From Falls are Often Medical Malpractice Cases

If you suffer an fractures from falls when a resident in a nursing home, assisted living, memory care, hospital or other medical or senior care environment the provide may be responsible in part or whole for a lack of supervision or improper use of medical equipment and other reasons.  You need expert medical opinions in Minnesota to bring a lawsuit for medical malpractice and for many issues related to wrongful death claims.

If you have questions about nursing home abuse and neglect and fractures or other fall related injuries contact Kenneth LaBore for a free consultation.  There is no fee unless there is a verdict or settlement offer from the wrongdoer.  Mr. LaBore can be reached directly at 612-743-9048 or toll free at 1-888-452-6589 or by email at KLaBore@MNnursinghomeneglect.com.

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Minnesota Nursing Home Neglect Fractures

Written By: Kenneth LaBore | Published On: 29th January 2017 | Category: Fall Injuries, Hoyer Lift, Patient Lift, Wrongful Death | RSS Feed
Nursing Home Resident Fractures From Falls

Nursing Home Resident Fractures From Falls

Nursing Home Neglect Fractures

Injuries such as nursing home neglect fractures are one of the most common types of elder neglect.   Falls from patient lifts, wheelchairs, in the shower and bathroom or falling from bed being examples.

Information About Nursing Home Neglect Fractures

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, CDC, falls among nursing home residents occur frequently and repeatedly.  About 1,800 older adults living in nursing homes die each year from fall-related injuries and those who survive falls frequently sustain hip fractures and head injuries that result in permanent disability and reduced quality of life.

  • In 2003, 1.5 million people 65 and older lived in nursing homes.  If current rates continue, by 2030 this number will rise to about 3 million.
  • About 5% of adults 65 and older live in nursing homes, but nursing home residents account for about 20% of deaths from falls in this age group.
  • Each year, a typical nursing home with 100 beds reports 100 to 200 falls. Many falls go unreported.
  • Between half and three-quarters of nursing home residents fall each year.  That’s twice the rate of falls for older adults living in the community.
  • Patients often fall more than once. The average is 2.6 falls per person per year.
  • About 35% of fall injuries occur among residents who cannot walk.

Common Cause of Nursing Home Neglect Fractures

The CDC, provides a list of common reasons and causes for the falls and fractures:

  •  Muscle weakness and walking or gait problems are the most common causes of falls among nursing home residents. These problems account for about 24% of the falls in nursing homes.
  • Environmental hazards in nursing homes cause 16% to 27% of falls among residents.
  • Such hazards include wet floors, poor lighting, incorrect bed height, and improperly fitted or maintained wheelchairs.
  • Medications can increase the risk of falls and fall-related injuries. Drugs that affect the central nervous system, such as sedatives and anti-anxiety drugs, are of particular concern. Fall risk is significantly elevated during the three days following any change in these types of medications.
  • Other causes of falls include difficulty in moving from one place to another (for example, from the bed to a chair), poor foot care, poorly fitting shoes, and improper or incorrect use of walking aids.

Nursing Home Neglect Fractures Attorney

If you have questions about nursing home abuse and neglect and fractures or other fall related injuries contact Kenneth LaBore for a free consultation.  There is no fee unless there is a verdict or settlement offer from the wrongdoer.  Mr. LaBore can be reached directly at 612-743-9048 or toll free at 1-888-452-6589 or by email at KLaBore@MNnursinghomeneglect.com.

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Free Consultation on Issues of Elder Abuse and Neglect Serving all of Minnesota Toll Free 1-888-452-6589

Free Consultation on Issues of Elder Abuse and Neglect Serving all of Minnesota Toll Free 1-888-452-6589

 

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