Archive for the ‘Lost Resident Wandering Elopement’ Category

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Hawley Retirement Inc. Hawley Minnesota Neglect Leads to Elopement

Written By: Kenneth LaBore | Published On: 22nd February 2017 | Category: Lost Resident Wandering Elopement | RSS Feed
Resident at Hawley Retirement Inc. Hawley Suffers Facial Injuries After Fall When Wandering After Being Left Unsupervised

Resident at Hawley Retirement Inc. Hawley Suffers Facial Injuries After Fall When Wandering After Being Left Unsupervised

Hawley Retirement Inc. Hawley Neglect Alleged After Resident Wanders and Falls

In a report dated January 9, 2017, The Minnesota Department of Health alleged that a client at Hawley Retirement Inc. Hawley was neglected when staff failed to provide adequate supervision.   The client was found lying face down on the ground, not properly dressed, with multiple injuries to his/her face requiring surgery.

Hawley Retirement Inc. Hawley Neglect Substantiated After Facial Injuries From Fall

Based on a preponderance of the evidence, neglect occurred when the facility failed to ensure a client was adequately supervised.  The client left the facility unsupervised and was found by police lying on the pavement approximately one block away.  The client sustained facial lacerations and a fractured jaw from the fall.

The client received services from the home care provider.  The client had cognitive deficits with significant memory impairment and a diagnosis of dementia.  The client was mostly independent but required staff cures to complete all activities of daily living and ambulation.  The client required staff assistance with meal preparation and medication management.  The client had a history of wandering within the building.  The client’s service plan directed staff to monitor the client whereabouts every one hour and to re-orient the client to his/her surroundings.  The client was an elopement risk due to a history of frequent requests to go outdoors.  The facilities intervention was for the client to wear a wander guard device that sounds a door alarm when the client was near an exit door that was opened.  The wander guard was placed on the client’s wrist and, the alarms were mounted at every exit door.  If an alarm sounded it required staff enter a code for deactivation.

During an interview, a witness stated s/he visited the building at least two times a week.  Mid-morning, she heard the north exit door wander guard alarm sounding.  The visitor knew the code and deactivated the alarm, the visitor told a staff person she had taken care of the alarm and left the area.

An interview with a staff person established she heard the alarm sounding for the north exit door and was on her way to the door when she met the visitor in the hallway.  The staff person was aware the visitor had deactivated the alarm.  When told by the visitor the alarm was taken care of, the staff person assumed the visitor had checked for clients locations that wore the wander guards.  The staff person did not check outside the exit door for any clients.  Approximately five to ten minutes after the alarm sounded, a police officer entered the building and told staff the client was found on the pavement approximately one block from the building.  Prior to that, the staff was not aware the client left the building.

Family transported the client to a hospital and the client was admitted with a lip and chin lacerations and a dislocated fracture of the left jaw.  The jaw fracture was managed conservatively with clear liquids and minimal use of lower jaw joint to allow for healing.  Due to the client’s fragile status, the client was discharged from the hospital six days following the fall, to home with family under hospice care.

An interview with the director of nursing established only the home care provider employees should have the code to deactivate the wander guard alarm.  Staff should check the location of the client to ensure safety.  It could not be determined who provided the visitor with the code to deactivate the alarm.

Review of the client’s certificate of death revealed the client passed away fourteen days following the elopement and fall with the primary cause of death as decreased oral intake due to dementia and deconditioning.

Hawley Retirement Inc. Hawley – Report Suspected Abuse and Neglect

Click Here For Link To Report Abuse To Adult Protection

Click Here For Link To Report Abuse To Adult Protection

For more information from the Minnesota Department of Health, Office of Health Facility Complaints concerning nursing homes, assisted living and other elder care providers view resolved complaints at the MDH website.

If you have concerns about financial exploitation or any other form of elder abuse or neglect contact Minnesota Elder Abuse Attorney Kenneth LaBore toll free at 612-743-9048 or toll free at 1-888-452-6589 or by email at KLaBore@MNnursinghomeneglect.com.

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Free Consultation on Issues of Elder Abuse and Neglect Serving all of Minnesota Toll Free 1-888-452-6589

Free Consultation on Issues of Elder Abuse and Neglect Serving all of Minnesota Toll Free 1-888-452-6589

 

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Allegations of Neglect at Amazing Love in Crystal

Written By: Kenneth LaBore | Published On: 11th June 2016 | Category: Lost Resident Wandering Elopement | RSS Feed
Failure to Supervise, Wandering Elopement for 26 days at Amazing Love in Crystal

Failure to Supervise, Wandering Elopement for 26 days at Amazing Love in Crystal

Client Missing for 26 Days Under Supervision of Amazing Love LLC

According to a report dated, June 9, 2016 from the Minnesota Department of Health, it is alleged that a client was neglected when the staff at Amazing Love in Crystal did not follow the client’s care plan and failed to provide adequate supervision.  The client went missing and has been missing for 26 days.

MDH Substantiated Neglect Against Amazing Love LLC in Crystal Minnesota

Based on a preponderance of the evidence neglect of supervision occurred when the home care provider failed to assess and implement measures for a client with a known history of elopement and wandering risk.  The client required direct supervision and staff escorts outside with appointments.  The client went missing for 35 days and when the client was found and was hospitalized for increased blood sugars and poor of medication compliance. The client was alert but had cognitive impairments, psychosis, wandering and a history of eloping.  The client had type two diabetes that required insulin.  The client was court ordered to be in the care of the home care provider for a period of three months.

On admission the client was assessed as a risk for wandering and elopement but there were no interventions and plummeted implemented related to this for the staff to follow.

For more information on this facility or nursing homes see the MDH website.

Supervision of residents and vulnerable adults is essential.  The failure to monitor seniors with cognitive issues can result in very serious injuries such as falls, fractures, Minnesota Nursing Home Wrongful Death Attorneydue to accidents or from severe weather and exposure.

If you are concerned about a vulnerable adult, or resident in elder care facility or receiving home care and want to consult with elder abuse and neglect attorney for a free consultation email Attorney Kenneth LaBore at KLaBore@MNnursinghomeneglect.com or call him directly at 612-743-9048 or toll free at 1-888-452-6589.

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Complaint Against Scandia Senior Care for Neglect, Lack of Supervision

Written By: Kenneth LaBore | Published On: 24th April 2016 | Category: Lost Resident Wandering Elopement | RSS Feed
Substantiated Complaint of Neglect Against Scandia Senior Care for Failure to Supervise Resident Allowed to Wander into Traffic

Substantiated Complaint of Neglect Against Scandia Senior Care for Failure to Supervise Resident Allowed to Wander into Traffic

Allegation of Neglect Against Scandia Senior Care for Neglect

In a report dated December 24, 2015, it was alleged that at Scandia Senior Care a client was neglected when staff failed to adequately supervise him/her when s/he left the facility and was found walking in a lane of traffic for at least 30 minutes.

Substantiated Neglect Allegation Against Scandia Senior Care

Based on a preponderance of the evidence, neglect did occur when facility staff failed to provide the level of supervision necessary to keep the client safe.  The client eloped from the facility and was found by the police, wandering on a busy street in traffic more than a mile from the facility.  Facility staff were unaware that the client had left the facility’s property.

The client had dementia, with a recent severe decline in cognition and mobility shortly before the elopement requiring increased supervision.  The client was at risk for falls and elopement due to recent decline.  The client needed interventions and monitoring to keep the client safe and protect him/her from harm after the decline but they were not implemented.  Staff were to monitor the client for potential elopement due to the client’s wander risk.  The client’s service plan was not updated after the decline to address how much supervision the client needed or how often staff were to check on the client’s whereabouts.

On a late afternoon in September 2015, the client eloped from the facility’s property sometime before dinner when an employee allowed the client to sit outside on the patio furniture alone, without any staff supervision.  The client was found by a neighbor approximately 1.25 miles from the facility, on a busy street with his/her walker.   The neighbor recognized the client, notified the client’s family member, and called the police.  The client’s family member transported the client back to the facility.  Facility staff didn’t know that the client eloped or was absent from the facility for 30-35 minutes.

For more information from the Minnesota Department of Health, Office of Health Facility Complaints concerning nursing homes, assisted living and other elder care providers view resolved complaints at the MDH website.

If you have concerns about wandering / elopement,  medication errors, improper use of medical equipment, falls or any other form of elder abuse or neglect contact Minnesota Elder Abuse Attorney Kenneth LaBore at 612-743-9048 or toll free at 1-888-452-6589 or by email at KLaBore@MNnursinghomeneglect.com.

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N and V Helpful Heart Care in Crystal Cited After Two Resident Wander

Written By: Kenneth LaBore | Published On: 8th April 2016 | Category: Lost Resident Wandering Elopement | RSS Feed
Residents at N and V Helpful Heart Care in Crystal Left Unsupervised and Allowed to Wander

Residents at N and V Helpful Heart Care in Crystal Left Unsupervised and Allowed to Wander

Lack of Supervision of Two Residents Leads to Neglect Finding

In a report from the Minnesota Department of Health, dated April 4, 2016, it is alleged that clients at N and V Helpful Heart Care in Crystal are not receiving adequate supervision.  The clients have left the facility without the staff being aware.  In addition, the client are not receiving the correct medications.

Minnesota Department of Health Cites N and V Helpful Heart Care After Residents Leave Facility Without Supervision

Based on a preponderance of the evidence neglect of supervision did occur when client #2 was allowed to go outside for a walk alone, but required direct supervision by staff on walks.  Client #2 got lost and was arrested by police.

Client was #2 was alert, but confused and forgetful, had a history of memory impairments, wandering, and elopement.

Staff interview and document review indicated #2 was a new admission to the comprehensive home care provider.  The nurse had assessed client #2 and indicated on client #2’s care plan that s/he could not be left alone to go outside for a walk unsupervised due to memory impairments.  The nurse’s assessment of this information was not communicated to nor was it included in the staff’s daily care plan for client #2.  On the second day of admission, around 4:00 p.m., client #2 had asked to go for a walk around the block and direct care staff allowed the client to go outside alone.  Staff were not aware that client #2 could not go offsite for a walk unsupervised.  After three hours, the client had not returned from the walk and the police were contacted.  The police informed the administrator that client #2 was found at a church approximately one block away and arrested.  The following day, client #2 was released from jail back to the care of the comprehensive home care provider.

For more information from the Minnesota Department of Health, Office of Health Facility Complaints concerning nursing homes, assisted living and other elder care providers view resolved complaints at the MDH website.

If you have concerns about medication errors, improper use of medical equipment, falls or any other form of elder abuse or neglect contact Minnesota Elder Abuse Attorney Kenneth LaBore at 612-743-9048 or toll free at 1-888-452-6589 or by email at KLaBore@MNnursinghomeneglect.com.

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Riverview Hospital and Nursing Home Cited with Neglect

Written By: Kenneth LaBore | Published On: 14th February 2016 | Category: Lost Resident Wandering Elopement | RSS Feed
Riverview Hospital and Nursing Home Cited with Neglect After Resident Elopes Due to Malfunctioning Door

Riverview Hospital and Nursing Home Cited with Neglect After Resident Elopes Due to Malfunctioning Door

Riverview Hospital and Nursing Home Cited with Neglect by MDH

In a report concluded on June 30, 2015, the Minnesota Department of Health cites Riverview Hospital and Nursing Home alleging that a resident was neglected when staff failed to adequately supervise the resident.  Staff was aware of a malfunctioning secure door a day prior to the resident leaving through the malfunctioning door.  The resident was found after dark on a busy highway a half mile away from the facility wearing no coat, hat or gloves.

Riverview Hospital and Nursing Home MDH Neglect Findings

Based on a preponderance of evidence the allegation of neglect is substantiated.  Staff failed to communicate and follow-up on the repair of a magnetic lock that failed to secure a door leading out of the facility.  The resident exited the secured facility at night in below freezing temperatures without appropriate clothing for the outside temperature.

For more information from the Minnesota Department of Health, Office of Health Facility Complaints concerning nursing homes, assisted living and other elder care providers view resolved complaints at the MDH website.

If you have concerns about neglect, wandering or elopement or any other form of elder abuse or neglect contact Minnesota Elder Abuse Attorney Kenneth LaBore toll free at 1-888-452-6589 or by email at KLaBore@MNnursinghomeneglect.com.

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Walker Methodist Health Center Minneapolis Neglect and Abuse Substantiated

Written By: Kenneth LaBore | Published On: 17th April 2015 | Category: Failure to Provide CPR, Financial Exploitation, Lost Resident Wandering Elopement, Sexual Abuse | RSS Feed
Failure to Follow POLST - Failure to Provide CPR

Failure to Follow POLST – Failure to Provide CPR at Walker Methodist Health Center

Failure to Follow POLST at Walker Methodist Health Center

In a report from the Minnesota Department of Health, dated March 2, 2017, it is alleged that neglect occurred against Walker Methodist Health Center when cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) was not performed on a resident who had a provider order for life sustaining treatment (POLST) form which indicated the resident requested resuscitation in the event that his/her heart stopped and s/he was not breathing.

Substantiated Neglect Due Failure to Provide CPR to Walker Methodist Health Center Resident

Based on a preponderance of the evidence, neglect occurred when nursing staff did not initiate cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) on the resident when it was determined that the resident was not breathing and did not have a pulse.

The resident’s provider order for life sustaining treatment (POLST), signed by a physician, indicated the resident requested CPR be started if the resident had no pulse and was not breathing.

On the day of the resident’s death, the resident was in the dining room after lunch.  The resident stood up from the wheelchair and sat on the floor.  This was not uncommon for the resident.  The nurse assigned to the resident and another staff member assisted the resident off the floor and sit back in the wheelchair.

Staff members took the resident to his/her room and put the resident into bed.  The nurse went to get the blood pressure machine and attempted to take the resident’s blood pressure.  The machine did not register a blood pressure on the resident.  The nurse turned the machine off and on three times, attempting to get a blood pressure each time.  The nurse said the resident was tired and looked sound asleep.  S/he did not attempt to manually obtain an apical or radial pulse from the resident.  The nurse left the resident alone to walk to the nurse’s station to look at the resident’s POLST.  The nurse interpreted the POLST to read “comfort cares’ and did not start CPR.  The nurse could not explain why the POLST was checked at that time.

The nurse then walked to an administrative nurse’s office where s/he also found the nursing supervisor.  The nurse asked the nursing supervisor to come to the resident’s room to check the vitals machine.  The nursing supervisor and the administrative nurse went to the resident’s room.  The nurse assigned to the resident stated approximately ten minutes elapsed from the time the resident was brought back to his/her room from the dining room until the nursing supervisor and the administrative nurse entered the resident’s room.

The nursing supervisor entered the resident’s room and found the resident’s skin was blue in color, cool to the touch, and the resident was not breathing.  The nursing supervisor took the resident’s apical pulse and determined the resident was deceased.  The administrative nurse verified the resident did not have a pulse.  The nurse assigned to the resident left the room to look at the resident’s medical record.  The nursing supervisor and the administrative nurse also left the resident’s room for an undetermined amount of time.  They reviewed the resident’s POLST and both read that the resident request CPR.  The nursing supervisor and the administrative nurse did not start CPR, and no one at the facility called 911.  The nursing supervisor said CPR was not started because the assigned nurse indicated the resident was expected to pass away and the family knew the resident was declining.  The nursing supervisor began the facility notification procedure for the death of the resident.

The physician was interviewed and stated the POLST document indicated the resident requested CPR in the event the resident did not have a pulse and was not breathing.

The family of the resident was interviewed and stated they had considered a change to the resident’s POLST from CPR to do not resuscitate, but there was no change to the order at the time of the resident’s death.

The resident’s death certificate indicated the cause of death was due to multiple co-existing diseases.

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Sexual Abuse of Vulnerable Adult

Neglect of a Resident and Sexual Abuse of Vulnerable Adult at Walker Methodist Health Center Minneapolis Minnesota

Walker Methodist Health Center Cited With Neglect

In a report from the Minnesota Department of Health, dated August 1, 2016, it is alleged that a resident at Walker Methodist Health Center was neglected when the facility failed to provide supervision to him/her.  The resident has not been located and been missing for multiple hours.

Based on a preponderance of the evidence neglect occurred when the resident left the facility unsupervised and sustained injuries from a fall.  The facility staff had knowledge of a prior attempt by the resident to leave the facility .  The facility failed to ensure elopement risk factors were evaluated and interventions in place for adequate supervision.

Walker Methodist Health Center Complaint Findings for Sexual Abuse

In a report concluded on January 13, 2015, the Minnesota Department of Health cites Walker Methodist Health Center for sexual abuse.

Based on a preponderance of the evidence, abuse is substantiated; the alleged perpetrator (AP) was observed sexually assaulting the resident.  The facility acted immediately to ensure the resident’s safety and remove the AP from premises.

The resident had diagnoses that include Alzheimer’s disease, osteoporosis and generalized muscle weakness.  The resident had cognitive deficits in all area and required assistance from staff for all cares and transfers.  The resident was minimally verbal, giving occasional, one word responses to a direct question.

The night the resident was assaulted, the witness was on his/her way to the kitchen around 4:30 a.m. and stepped into the bathroom, located just inside the doorway of the resident’s room to wash his/her hands.  The witness saw the AP’s back at the edge of the resident’s bed, the resident’s bare legs on both sides of the AP’s hips and the tape tabs, located on the sides of the resident’s incontinent product, open on the bed indicating that the resident’s brief was open.  The witness did not release what the AP was doing until s/he saw the AP move in a back and forth, thrusting motion, about four times.  When the witness realized that the AP was sexually assaulting the resident, s/he knocked on the door to alert the AP to his/her presence in the room.  The AP turned around briefly and saw the witness.  The AP then quickly moved back from the resident, placed the residents legs back on the bed and replaced the resident’s incontinent product.  The witness immediately contacted the night supervisor who removed the AP from the floor.  The police were called and the AP was taken to jail and charged with sexual assault.  The resident was taken to the hospital for a sexual assault examination.

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Nursing Home Abuse - Theft From Residents - Financial Exploitation - Walker Methodist Health Center Complaint Findings for Exploitation

Nursing Home Abuse – Theft From Residents – Financial Exploitation – Walker Methodist Health Center Complaint Findings for Exploitation

Walker Methodist Health Center Complaint Findings for Exploitation

In another report concluded on April 3, 2013, the Minnesota Department of Health cites Walker Methodist Health Center for exploitation by other.

Based on a preponderance of the evidence, financial exploitation is substantiated in connection with the theft of a resident’s credit card by the AP.

For more information from the Minnesota Department of Health, Office of Health Facility Complaints concerning nursing homes, assisted living and other elder care providers view resolved complaints at the MDH website.

If you have concerns about sexual abuse or any other form of elder abuse or neglect contact Elder Abuse and Neglect Attorney Kenneth LaBore toll free at 1-888-452-6589 or by email at KLaBore@MNnursinghomeneglect.com.

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Nursing Home Abuse and Neglect Lawyer Kenneth LaBore Offers Free Consultations and Serves Clients Throughout the State of Minnesota Call Toll Free at 1-888-452-6589

Nursing Home Abuse and Neglect Lawyer Kenneth LaBore Offers Free Consultations and Serves Clients Throughout the State of Minnesota Call Toll Free at 1-888-452-6589

 

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The Gardens St Gertrudes Shakopee Neglect Substantiated

Written By: Kenneth LaBore | Published On: 17th April 2015 | Category: Fall Injuries, Lost Resident Wandering Elopement | RSS Feed
Wandering Elopement Fall with Injuries

Wandering Elopement Fall with Injuries at the Garden St Gertrudes Skakopee Minnesota

The Gardens St Gertrudes Shakopee Complaint Findings for Neglect – Falls

In a report concluded on February 10, 2015, the Minnesota Department of Health cites The Gardens St Gertrudes Shakopee  for neglect of supervision neglect of health care – falls.

It was alleged that a client was neglected when the client eloped from the facility during the night and had a fall with injuries.  The client had a history of wandering; however, was only monitored during the night every four hours.

Substantiated Neglect at St Gertrudes Shakopee Failure to Supervise Leading to Fall

Based on a preponderance of evidence, neglect of supervision leading to a client eloping from the facility during the night and sustaining a fall with serious injuries is substantiated.  Although the client had other medical concerns, which led to a brain aneurysm, the facility did not ensure supervision for the client’s safety.

The client was admitted to the facility following a hospital stay for aneurysm (bleeding in the brain).  The client had resulting difficulty speaking and increased, intermittent confusion.  The client was noted to wander during the hospital stay.  The client ambulated independently with cues for direction.  Upon admission to the facility, the service plan did not note the client had a history of wandering but did note staff were to check the resident every four hours at 11:00 p.m. and 3:00 a.m.

On the seventh night, staff checked on the client at approximately 11:00 p.m., and the client was asleep.  When staff went to check on the client at approximately 3:00 a.m., staff could not locate the client in the client’s apartment.  Staff searched in the building for the client, in the assisted living, the nursing home area, and the hospital area.  They were unable to locate the client.

During the search for the client, a staff member from the adjoining hospital found the client lying on the ground outside the facility at the edge of the parking lot and called the police.  The police came to the facility and staff identified it was the client who was missing.  The client had been found lying on the ground unconscious with heavy bleeding head wound.

For more information from the Minnesota Department of Health, Office of Health Facility Complaints concerning nursing homes, assisted living and other elder care providers view resolved complaints at the MDH website.

If you have concerns about wandering/elopement, falls or any other form of elder abuse or neglect contact Elder Abuse and Neglect Attorney Kenneth LaBore toll fre at 1-888-452-6589 or by email at KLaBore@MNnursinghomeneglect.com.

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Vasa Children Home Red Wing Neglect Substantiated

Written By: Kenneth LaBore | Published On: 16th April 2015 | Category: Lost Resident Wandering Elopement | RSS Feed
Neglect of Supervision Elopement Wandering

Neglect of Supervision Elopement Wandering at Vasa Children Home in Red Wing Minnesota

Vasa Children Home Red Wing Complaint Findings for Neglect of Supervision

In a report concluded on September 20, 2012, the Minnesota Department of Health cites Vasa Children Home Red Wing for neglect of supervision.

The allegation is neglect of supervision based on the following: Client #1 was outside with other children and staff person, and eloped from the front yard.  A teacher who was driving by found Client #1 on the shoulder of Highway 61 and grabbed him just as he was darting out into traffic and bough him back to the facility.

Vasa Children Home Red Wing Substantiated Complaint of Neglect

It is very important that individuals with intellectual disabilities including seniors with Alzheimer’s/dementia who are ambulatory and can roam or wander.  There are many instances where vulnerable adults get confused or lost and end up putting themselves in very stressful and dangerous situations where they attempt to cross busy traffic or bodies of water, etc. without appreciating the danger.

For more information from the Minnesota Department of Health, Office of Health Facility Complaints concerning nursing homes, assisted living and other elder care providers view resolved complaints at the MDH website.

If you have concerns about wandering elopement or any other form of elder abuse or neglect contact Elder Abuse and Neglect Attorney Kenneth LaBore toll free at 1-888-452-6589 or by email at KLaBore@MNnursinghomeneglect.com.

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Sunset Homes Assisted Living Rochester Complaint

Written By: Kenneth LaBore | Published On: 12th April 2015 | Category: Lost Resident Wandering Elopement | RSS Feed
Failure to Supervise, Wandering Elopement

Failure to Supervise, Wandering Elopement at Sunset Homes Assisted Living Rochester Minnesota

Sunset Homes Assisted Living Rochester Complaint Findings for Neglect – Supervision

In a report concluded on January 23, 2015, the Minnesota Department of Health cites Sunset Homes Assisted Living Rochester for neglect of supervision – wandering/elopement.

It is alleged that a client was neglected when staff failed to adequately supervise the client.  The client went missing for 3 1/2 hours and was found in a wooded area.

Sunset Homes Substantiated Neglect Failure to Supervise

The preponderance of evidence established that neglect of supervision occurred when the facility failed to provide the client with supervision and the client wandered from the facility unsupervised three times over an approximate six-week period of time.

The client had dementia and a history of wandering behaviors at the facility the client resided at prior to admission.  The client’s care plan indicated that the client may wander and staff were to check on the client hourly.

Three days after the client was admitted to the facility, the client left the facility and was approximately 30 minutes later, by a family member, walking a half mile away from the facility, on a rural gravel road that leads to the facility, unsupervised.  Staff indicated after the incident, they were instructed by the administrator to continue to monitor the client for wandering behaviors and intervene to keep the client safe.

Approximately six weeks after the client was admitted to the facility, the client left the facility when staff were providing cares to other clients.  The client was found in the nearby woods approximately 2 hours later.  The client walked away from the facility through two unlocked service door to the garage.  Staff noticed the client’s cane by the service door and noted the client was missing after a search of the building.  The police were notified by the family of the client to assist in the search.  The family discharged the client from the facility.  No injuries to the client were reported.

For more information from the Minnesota Department of Health, Office of Health Facility Complaints concerning nursing homes, assisted living and other elder care providers view resolved complaints at the MDH website.

If you have concerns about wandering/elopement or any other form of elder abuse or neglect contact Elder Abuse and Neglect Attorney Kenneth LaBore at 612-743-9048 or toll free at 1-888-452-6589 or by email at KLaBore@MNnursinghomeneglect.com.

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Sacred Heart Care Center Austin Neglect Substantiated

Written By: Kenneth LaBore | Published On: 7th April 2015 | Category: Lost Resident Wandering Elopement | RSS Feed
Wandering and Elopement

Wandering and Elopement at Sacred Heart Care Center in Austin Minnesota

 

Sacred Heart Care Center Austin Complaint Findings for Neglect – Supervision

In a report concluded on June 8, 2011, the Minnesota Department of Health cites Sacred Heart Care Center Austin for neglect of supervision – wandering.

The allegation is neglect of supervision based on the following: Resident #1 was not adequately supervised when she was found away from the building in her pajamas and on a bridge.  Staff was not aware that she had left the building.

According to alz.org, anyone who has memory problems and is able to walk is at risk for wandering. Even in the early stages of dementia, a person can become disoriented or confused for a period of time. It’s important to plan ahead for this type of situation.  Be on the lookout for the following warning signs:

Wandering and getting lost is common among people with dementia and can happen during any stage of the disease.

  • Returns from a regular walk or drive later than usual
  • Tries to fulfill former obligations, such as going to work
  • Tries or wants to “go home,” even when at home
  • Is restless, paces or makes repetitive movements
  • Has difficulty locating familiar places like the bathroom, bedroom or dining room
  • Asks the whereabouts of current or past friends and family
  • Acts as if doing a hobby or chore, but nothing gets done (e.g., moves around pots and dirt without actually planting anything)
  • Appears lost in a new or changed environment

The Alzheimer’s Association offers programs designed to assist in the monitoring and return of those who wander.  MedicAlert® + Alzheimer’s Association Safe Return® is a nationwide identification program designed to save lives by facilitating the safe return of those who wander.

Tips to prevent wandering. Wandering can happen, even if you are the most diligent of caregivers. Use the following strategies to help lower the chances:

  • Carry out daily activities.
  • Having a routine can provide structure. Learn about creating a daily plan.
  • Identify the most likely times of day that wandering may occur.
  • Plan activities at that time. Activities and exercise can reduce anxiety, agitation and restlessness.

Reassure the person if he or she feels lost, abandoned or disoriented.  If the person with dementia wants to leave to “go home” or “go to work,” use communication focused on exploration and validation.  Refrain from correcting the person. For example, “We are staying here tonight.  We are safe and I’ll be with you.  We can go home in the morning after a good night’s rest.”

  • Ensure all basic needs are met.
  • Has the person gone to the bathroom? Is he or she thirsty or hungry?
  • Avoid busy places that are confusing and can cause disorientation.
    This could be a shopping malls, grocery stores or other busy venues.

Read more: http://www.alz.org/care/alzheimers-dementia-wandering.asp

For more information from the Minnesota Department of Health, Office of Health Facility Complaints concerning nursing homes, assisted living and other elder care providers view resolved complaints at the MDH website.

If you have concerns about wandering elopement or any other form of elder abuse or neglect contact Elder Abuse and Neglect Attorney Kenneth LaBore at toll free at 1-888-452-6589 or by email at KLaBore@MNnursinghomeneglect.com.

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