Archive for the ‘Infectious Diseases (MRSA, C-Diff)’ Category

Page 1 of 212

Golden Living Center Lake Ridge Roseville – Negligent Infection Control

Written By: Kenneth LaBore | Published On: 16th March 2015 | Category: Infectious Diseases (MRSA, C-Diff) | RSS Feed
Nursing Care Infection Control

Nursing Care Infection Control Issue at Golden Living Center Lake Ridge Roseville Minnesota

Golden Living Center Lake Ridge Roseville Complaint Findings for Nursing Care Infection Control

In a report concluded on April 19, 2013, the Minnesota Department of Health cites Golden Living Center Lake Ridge Roseville for nursing care infection control.

Infection Control Neglect at Golden Living Center Lake Ridge Roseville

Minnesota Department of Health states: infectious diseases, from flu to smallpox, affect all of us at one time or another. Through the Infectious Disease Division (IDEPC), we monitor the occurrence of infectious diseases, develop strategies for preventing and controlling disease, and work to put those strategies into action.

For more information from the Minnesota Department of Health, Office of Health Facility Complaints concerning nursing homes, assisted living and other elder care providers view resolved complaints at the MDH website.

If you have concerns about infection and disease control or any other form of elder abuse or neglect contact Elder Abuse and Negelct Attorney Kenneth LaBore toll free at 1-888-452-6589 or by email at KLaBore@MNnursinghomeneglect.com.

Disclaimer

Nursing Home Abuse and Neglect Lawyer Kenneth LaBore Offers Free Consultations and Serves Clients Throughout the State of Minnesota Call Toll Free at 1-888-452-6589

Nursing Home Abuse and Neglect Lawyer Kenneth LaBore Offers Free Consultations and Serves Clients Throughout the State of Minnesota Call Toll Free at 1-888-452-6589

 

Facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmail

Caring Nurses Brooklyn Park Neglect Substantiated – Infection Control

Written By: Kenneth LaBore | Published On: 6th March 2015 | Category: Caregivers Resources, Infectious Diseases (MRSA, C-Diff) | RSS Feed
All Seniors and Vulnerable Adults Deserve Quality Care and Nursing Services

All Seniors and Vulnerable Adults Deserve Quality Care and Nursing Services, Caring Nurses Brooklyn Park

Caring Nurses Brooklyn Park Complaint Findings for Nursing Care

In a report concluded on December 17, 2012, the Minnesota Department of Health cites Caring Nurses Brooklyn Park for nursing care.

It is alleged that the agency did not follow state statutes and rules when they admitted a client prior to ensuring that a physician would accept his care.  In addition, the agency did not have adequate information in the admission materials to meet the client’s needs.  Concerns were also raised regarding the care of two other clients in the shared apartments and also whether such a setting is adequate in relation to infection control and proper ventilation considering all the clients are vent dependent.

Substantiated Complaint Against Caring Nurses Brooklyn Park – Infectious Disease

Infectious disease control starts with employees.  According to osha.org, healthcare workers (HCWs) are occupationally exposed to a variety of infectious diseases during the performance of their duties. The delivery of healthcare services requires a broad range of workers, such as physicians, nurses, technicians, clinical laboratory workers, first responders, building maintenance, security and administrative personnel, social workers, food service, housekeeping, and mortuary personnel. Moreover, these workers can be found in a variety of workplace settings, including hospitals, nursing care facilities, outpatient clinics (e.g., medical and dental offices, and occupational health clinics), ambulatory care centers, and emergency response settings. The diversity among HCWs and their workplaces makes occupational exposure to infectious diseases especially challenging. For example, not all workers in the same healthcare facility, not all individuals with the same job title, and not all healthcare facilities will be at equal risk of occupational exposure to infectious agents.

For more information from the Minnesota Department of Health, Office of Health Facility Complaints concerning nursing homes, assisted living and other elder care providers view resolved complaints at the MDH website.

If you have concerns about infectious disease control,  nursing care or any other form of elder abuse or neglect contact Elder Abuse and Neglect Attorney Kenneth LaBore at 612-743-9048 or toll free at 1-888-452-6589 or by email at KLaBore@MNnursinghomeneglect.com.

Disclaimer

Nursing Home Abuse and Neglect Lawyer Kenneth LaBore Offers Free Consultations and Serves Clients Throughout the State of Minnesota Call Toll Free at 1-888-452-6589

Nursing Home Abuse and Neglect Lawyer Kenneth LaBore Offers Free Consultations and Serves Clients Throughout the State of Minnesota Call Toll Free at 1-888-452-6589

 

Facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmail

Minneapolis State Vets Home Suspects Norovirus in Resident Deaths

Written By: Kenneth LaBore | Published On: 20th March 2014 | Category: Infectious Diseases (MRSA, C-Diff) | RSS Feed
Norovirus May Have Contributed to Death of Senior Citizen

Norovirus May Have Contributed to Death of Senior Citizen

Norovirus May Have Lead to Resident Death

An investigation is underway on what has recently caused 4 deaths within a state vet’s home in Minneapolis after norovirus is suspected in resident’s death.

Earlier in March, four residents of a state veteran’s home in Minneapolis died from a possible outbreak of  a virus. Norovirus is a foodborne illness that can be very dangerous to the elderly and those with compromised immune systems.

The home stopped taking new admissions, according to the Minnesota Department of Veterans Affairs. In addition to the four residents that passed away, over a dozen employees called in sick.  It can cause diarrhea, vomiting, and cramps. It is an illness that results in 70,000 hospitalizations each year and 800 of those die. Children and the elderly are among those that are more susceptible to the most serious aspects of the illness.

The facility, one of the largest of its kind in the state, has been subject to repeated federal and state investigations because there have been four other suspicious deaths within the facility, including one from a medication error.

The suspected norovirus outbreak began on March 7, but the cause of the four deaths is being investigated because all four residents had other health problems. There has been one hospitalization confirmed to be the result of norovirus.

According to CDC, it is a very contagious virus. You can get norovirus from an infected person, contaminated food or water, or by touching contaminated surfaces. The virus causes your stomach or intestines or both to get inflamed (acute gastroenteritis). This leads you to have stomach pain, nausea, and diarrhea and to throw up.

Anyone can be infected with norovirus and get sick. Also, you can have norovirus illness many times in your life. Norovirus illness can be serious, especially for young children and older adults.

It is the most common cause of acute gastroenteritis in the United States. Each year, it causes 19-21 million illnesses and contributes to 56,000-71,000 hospitalizations and 570-800 deaths. Norovirus is also the most common cause of foodborne-disease outbreaks in the United States.

The best way to help prevent norovirus is to practice proper hand washing and general cleanliness

Minnesota Department Health Discusses Norovirus

The Minnesota Department of Health said that the home had reported a suspected virus outbreak involving eight residents living in a 30-person unit. The home then contacted the department to report a second unit had become involved. It had no information on how many employees may have been affected.

The department then sent testing kits and informational materials to the home and remained in daily contact with the home.

The Health Department had no additional information on the deaths, but it was said that that information may not be immediately available until after the tests results have been returned. No quarantines were issued by the Health Department, but visitors were limited and movement between units was limited.

The State Veteran’s Department said that it has temporarily held any new admissions and is monitoring the situation on a daily basis. In these types of cases, residents remain in their units in order to limit exposure. Activities are also limited.

While the Health Department investigates the illnesses, veteran’s officials have said that it is common for hospitals, nursing homes, and care facilities to have norovirus outbreaks because of how the illness is spread and the degree of vulnerability of the residents and patients. This outbreak has not hit the home as hard as it has in past years.

Norovirus is most prevalent during November, December, and January. However, there have been some recent outbreaks recorded throughout Minnesota. In Brooklyn Park, a coffee shop was shut down for approximately a week after an outbreak.

Veteran’s facilities across the country have also been hit hard. In one case, 125 veterans and 25 staff members reported becoming sick with norovirus. Another facility was quarantined in early March due to an outbreak.

Report Suspected Infectious Disease Including Possible Norovirus Resident Deaths

Click Here For Link To Report Abuse To Adult Protection

Click Here For Link To Report Abuse To Adult Protection

For more information from the Minnesota Department of Health, Office of Health Facility Complaints concerning nursing homes, assisted living and other elder care providers view resolved complaints at the MDH website.

If you have concerns about or any form of elder abuse or neglect contact Minnesota Elder Abuse Attorney Kenneth LaBore toll free at 612-743-9048 or toll free at 1-888-452-6589 or by email at KLaBore@MNnursinghomeneglect.com.

Disclaimer

Free Consultation on Issues of Elder Abuse and Neglect Serving all of Minnesota Toll Free 1-888-452-6589

Free Consultation on Issues of Elder Abuse and Neglect Serving all of Minnesota Toll Free 1-888-452-6589

 

Facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmail

Staph Infections in Nursing Homes – Preventable Neglect

Written By: Kenneth LaBore | Published On: 14th April 2013 | Category: Infectious Diseases (MRSA, C-Diff), Nursing Home Abuse and Neglect, Nursing Home Care Issues | RSS Feed

Staph Infections in Nursing Homes – Neglect

Staphylococcus aureus is a common bacterium found on the skin and in the noses of up to 25% of healthy people and animals. Staphylococcus aureus is important because it has the ability to make seven different toxins that are frequently responsible for food poisoning.  Staph investigations in nursing homes can be greatly reduced with proper hygiene an infectious disease procedures.

According to the Mayo Clinic, staph infections are caused by staphylococcus bacteria, types of germs commonly found on the skin or in the nose of even healthy individuals. Most of the time, these bacteria cause no problems or result in relatively minor skin infections.
But staph infections can turn deadly if the bacteria invade deeper into your body, entering your bloodstream, joints, bones, lungs or heart. A growing number of otherwise healthy people are developing life-threatening staph infections.

Treatment usually involves antibiotics and drainage of the infected area. However, some staph infections no longer respond to common antibiotics.

Staph Bacterium - Staph Infections in Nursing Homes

Staph Bacterium – Staph Infections in Nursing Homes

 

Frequently Asked Questions – Staph Infections in Nursing Homes

bulleted list item, level 1 What is Staphylococcus?
bulleted list item, level 1 What is staphylococcal food poisoning?
bulleted list item, level 1 What are the symptoms of staphylococcal food poisoning?
bulleted list item, level 1 How do I know if I have staphylococcal food poisoning?
bulleted list item, level 1 How should a patient with suspected staphylococcal food poisoning be treated?
bulleted list item, level 1 Is a sick patient infectious?
bulleted list item, level 1 How can staphylococcal food poisoning be prevented?

Staph Infections in Nursing Homes – Report Abuse and Neglect

Click Here For Link To Report Abuse To Adult Protection

Click Here For Link To Report Abuse To Adult Protection

If you or a loved one has suffered an injury from Staph, C Diff, MRSA, VRE, CRE or any other infectious disease or other neglect or abuse in a nursing home or other care facility that serves the elderly in Minnesota please contact Attorney Kenneth L. LaBore, directly please send an email to KLaBore@mnnursinghomeneglect.com, or call Ken at 612-743-9048 or call him at his direct toll free number 1-888-452-6589.

Disclaimer

Nursing Home Abuse and Neglect Lawyer Kenneth LaBore Offers Free Consultations and Serves Clients Throughout the State of Minnesota Call Toll Free at 1-888-452-6589

Nursing Home Abuse and Neglect Lawyer Kenneth LaBore Offers Free Consultations and Serves Clients Throughout the State of Minnesota Call Toll Free at 1-888-452-6589

 

Facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmail

C-Diff Infection in Nursing Home

Written By: Kenneth LaBore | Published On: 13th April 2013 | Category: Caregivers Resources, Infectious Diseases (MRSA, C-Diff), Nursing Home Abuse and Neglect | RSS Feed

C-Diff Infection – Common Risk for Residents in Elder Care Facilities

Clostridium difficileC- Diff infections are caused by the germ C. difficile – remains at  historically high levels. C. difficile causes diarrhea linked to 14,000  American deaths each year. Those most at risk are people, especially older  adults, who take antibiotics and also get medical care. CDC provides  guidelines and tools to the healthcare community to help prevent Clostridium difficile infections as well as provides resources to help the public safeguard their own health.

More Information on C-Diff Infection

PHIL 3876 lores C Diff Infection in Nursing Home

Picture of C-Diff Clostridium difficile, C-Diff Infection

C Diff in Nursing Home Facilities and Other Settings, Source CDC

Frequently Asked Questions C-Diff Infections – Source CDC

Stopping C. Difficile Infections – Making Health Care Safer – Source CDC

If you or a loved one has suffered an injury from Staph, C Diff, MRSA, VRE, CRE infections or any other infectious disease or other neglect or abuse in a nursing home or other care facility that serves the elderly in Minnesota please contact  Attorney Kenneth L. LaBore, directly please send an email to KLaBore@mnnursinghomeneglect.com, or call Ken at 612-743-9048 or call him at his direct toll free number 1-888-452-6589.

Disclaimer

Nursing Home Abuse and Neglect Lawyer Kenneth LaBore Offers Free Consultations and Serves Clients Throughout the State of Minnesota Call Toll Free at 1-888-452-6589

Nursing Home Abuse and Neglect Lawyer Kenneth LaBore Offers Free Consultations and Serves Clients Throughout the State of Minnesota Call Toll Free at 1-888-452-6589

 

Facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmail

CRE Infection in Nursing Homes

Written By: Kenneth LaBore | Published On: 13th April 2013 | Category: Caregivers Resources, Infectious Diseases (MRSA, C-Diff), Nursing Home Abuse and Neglect, Nursing Home Care Issues | RSS Feed

CRE Infection in Nursing Homes

CRE  – Carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae is a new high risk infectious disease.  According to Wikipedia: Carbapenem-resistant enterobacteriaceae (CRE), a CRE Infection is a family of gram-negative bacterium that are nearly immune to the carbapenem class of antibiotics, considered the “drug of last resort” for such infections. Death rates of up to 50%[1] can be seen in patients with CRE Sepsis, a rate much higher than other resistant infections such as MRSA or Clostridium difficile.

PHIL Image 14555

According to the Centers for Disease Control, CRE was first detected in a North Carolina hospital in 2001. Since that time, it has been identified in health care facilities in 41 other states. Studies showed that 3% of patients in Chicago-area ICUs carried CRE.[2] The same data indicated a 30% infection rate in long-term care facilities (e.g. nursing homes), though not all patients are symptomatic. During just the first half of 2012, almost 200 hospitals and long-term acute care facilities treated at least one patient infected with these bacteria.[1] There is no billing code for CRE under Medicare or Medicaid, making it difficult to track on a national level in the U.S.

According to the CDC – CRE Infections Prevention

Healthy people usually do not get CRE infections.  In healthcare settings, CRE infections most commonly occur among patients who are receiving treatment for other conditions. Patients whose care requires devices like ventilators (breathing machines), urinary (bladder) catheters, or intravenous (vein) catheters, and patients who are taking long courses of certain antibiotics are most at risk for CRE infections.

Frequently Asked Questions About CRE Infection – Source CDC

CRE Tool Kit from CDC

If you or a loved one has suffered an injury from Staph, C Diff, MRSA, VRE, CRE or any other infectious disease or other neglect or abuse in a nursing home or other care facility that serves the elderly in Minnesota please contact  Attorney Kenneth L. LaBore, directly please send an email to KLaBore@mnnursinghomeneglect.com, or call Ken at 612-743-9048 or call him at his direct toll free number 1-888-452-6589.

Disclaimer

Nursing Home Abuse and Neglect Lawyer Kenneth LaBore Offers Free Consultations and Serves Clients Throughout the State of Minnesota Call Toll Free at 1-888-452-6589

Nursing Home Abuse and Neglect Lawyer Kenneth LaBore Offers Free Consultations and Serves Clients Throughout the State of Minnesota Call Toll Free at 1-888-452-6589

 

Facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmail

MRSA Infection is a Risk in Nursing Homes

Written By: Kenneth LaBore | Published On: 13th April 2013 | Category: Caregivers Resources, Infectious Diseases (MRSA, C-Diff) | RSS Feed
MRSA Infection - MRSA Infectious Disease

MRSA Infection – MRSA Infectious Disease

What is a MRSA Infection?

MRSA Infection, Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus Aureus (MRSA) is a type of staph bacteria infection that is resistant to certain antibiotics called  beta-lactams. These resistant antibiotics include methicillin and other more common antibiotics such as penicillin, amoxicillin, and oxacillin. Most MRSA infections are skin infections.  See, CDC Definition of MRSA Infection.

MRSA Infection Statistics

In 2010, encouraging results from a CDC study published in the Journal of the American Medical AssociationExternal Web Site Icon showed that invasive (life-threatening) MRSA infections in healthcare settings are declining. Invasive MRSA infections that began in hospitals declined 28% from 2005 through 2008. Decreases in infection rates were even bigger for patients with bloodstream infections. In addition, the study showed a 17% drop in invasive MRSA infections that were diagnosed before hospital admissions (community onset) in people with recent exposures to healthcare settings.

This study (or report) complements data from the National Healthcare Safety Network (NHSN) that found rates of MRSA bloodstream infections occurring in hospitalized patients fell nearly 50% from 1997 to 2007.

MRSA Infection Topics Provided by the Center for Disease Control – Source CDC

MRSADefinition

What is MRSA?…

CDC MRSA Prevention in a Health Care SettingPrevention

Personal, Healthcare Settings, Athletics, Schools…

CDC Information on MRSA TreatmentTreatment also Care of MRSA

What To Do, Clinical Information…

CDC Information on MRSA Tracking and DiagnosisDiagnosis & Testing

Clinical Diagnosis, Laboratory Information…

CDC MRSA Information Statistics

Tracking and Statistical Data…

Information from the CDC on MRSA Symptoms

Skin Infections, Photos, …

peoplePeople at Risk

Personal, Healthcare Settings, Athletics, Schools…

Information from CDC on Causes of MRSACauses

MRSA Information, How MRSA is Spread, Origins…

CDC Images of MRSA

Educational Resources General education & Athletic posters…

If you or a loved one has suffered an injury from Staph, C Diff, MRSA Infection, VRE, CRE   or any other infectious disease or other neglect or abuse in a nursing home or other care facility that serves the elderly in Minnesota please contact Attorney Kenneth L. LaBore, directly please send an email to KLaBore@mnnursinghomeneglect.com, or call Ken at 612-743-9048 or call him at his direct toll free number 1-888-452-6589.

Disclaimer

Nursing Home Abuse and Neglect Lawyer Kenneth LaBore Offers Free Consultations and Serves Clients Throughout the State of Minnesota Call Toll Free at 1-888-452-6589

Nursing Home Abuse and Neglect Lawyer Kenneth LaBore Offers Free Consultations and Serves Clients Throughout the State of Minnesota Call Toll Free at 1-888-452-6589

 

Facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmail

VRE Infections in Nursing Homes

Written By: Kenneth LaBore | Published On: 13th April 2013 | Category: Caregivers Resources, Infectious Diseases (MRSA, C-Diff) | RSS Feed

What is VRE – How to Keep Safe in a Nursing Home from VRE Infections

VRE Bacterium - VRE Infections

VRE Bacterium – VRE Infections

VRE Infections – VRE also known as Vancomycin-Resistant Enterococcus (VRE) Infection which is a antimicrobial-resistant bacteria that are resistant to vancomycin, the drug often used to treat infections caused by enterococci.  According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention CDC , enteroccocci are bacteria that are normally present in the human intestines and in the female genital tract and are often found in the environment. These bacteria can sometimes cause infections. Most vancomycin-resistant Enterococci infections occur in hospitals.

CDC Resources for Patients and Healthcare Providers on VRE Infections

Frequently Asked Questions About VRE – From CDC

VRE Infections- What are the types of vancomycin resistance in enterococci?

According to the CDC – there are the two types of VRE infections vancomycin resistance in enterococci. The first type is intrinsic resistance. Isolates of Enterococcus gallinarum and E. casseliflavus/E. flavescens demonstrate an inherent, low-level resistance to vancomycin.

The second type of vancomycin resistance in enterococci is acquired resistance. Enterococci can become resistant to vancomycin by acquisition of genetic information from another organism. Most commonly, this resistance is seen in E. faecium and E. faecalis, but also has been recognized in E. raffinosus, E. avium, E. durans, and several other enterococcal species.

If you or a loved one has suffered an injury from Staph, C Diff, MRSA, VRE, CRE  or any other infectious disease or other neglect or abuse in a nursing home or other care facility that serves the elderly in Minnesota please contact Attorney Kenneth L. LaBore, directly please send an email to KLaBore@mnnursinghomeneglect.com, or call Ken at 612-743-9048 or call him at his direct toll free number 1-888-452-6589.

Disclaimer

Nursing Home Abuse and Neglect Lawyer Kenneth LaBore Offers Free Consultations and Serves Clients Throughout the State of Minnesota Call Toll Free at 1-888-452-6589

Nursing Home Abuse and Neglect Lawyer Kenneth LaBore Offers Free Consultations and Serves Clients Throughout the State of Minnesota Call Toll Free at 1-888-452-6589

 

Facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmail

Spread of MRSA What is Minnesota Law Concerning the Reduction of Spread of MRSA in Health Care Facilities?

Written By: Kenneth LaBore | Published On: 3rd January 2013 | Category: Caregivers Resources, Infectious Diseases (MRSA, C-Diff) | RSS Feed
MRSA

Infectious Disease – Spread of MRSA

What is the law in Minnesota to reduce the spread of MRSA?

Reduce the Spread of MRSAMinnesota Statute 144.585, METHICILLIN-RESISTANT STAPHYLOCOCCUS AUREUS CONTROL PROGRAMS.  In order to improve the prevention of hospital-associated infections due to methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), every hospital shall establish an MRSA control program that meets Minnesota Department of Health MRSA recommendations as published January 15, 2008 to reduce the spread of MRSA.

Ways to Reduce the Spread of MRSA

To reduce the spread of MRSA, the Department of Health should consider the following infection control practices:

(1) identification of MRSA-colonized patients in all intensive care units, or other at-risk patients identified by the hospital;
(2) isolation of identified MRSA-colonized or MRSA-infected patients in an appropriate manner;
(3) adherence to hand hygiene requirements; and
(4) monitor trends in the incidence of spread of MRSA in the hospital over time and modify interventions if MRSA infection rates do not decrease
The Department of Health shall review the MRSA recommendations on an annual basis and revise the recommendations as necessary, in accordance with available scientific data and to reduce the spread of MRSA.

This website is not intended to provide legal advice as each situation is different and specific factual information must be obtained before an attorney is able to assess the legal questions relevant to your situation.

If you or a loved one has suffered an injury or infectious disease such as MRSA in a nursing home or other care facility that serves the elderly in Minnesota please contact our firm for a free consultation and information regarding the obligations of the facility and your rights as a resident or concerned family member. To contact Attorney Kenneth L. LaBore, directly please send an email to KLaBore@MNnursinghomeneglect.com or call Ken at 612-743-9048.

Disclaimer

Nursing Home Abuse and Neglect Lawyer Kenneth LaBore Offers Free Consultations and Serves Clients Throughout the State of Minnesota Call Toll Free at 1-888-452-6589

Nursing Home Abuse and Neglect Lawyer Kenneth LaBore Offers Free Consultations and Serves Clients Throughout the State of Minnesota Call Toll Free at 1-888-452-6589

 

Facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmail

How to Identify Elder Abuse?

Written By: Kenneth LaBore | Published On: 30th November 2012 | Category: Caregivers Resources, Fall Injuries, Inadequate Staffing/Training, Infectious Diseases (MRSA, C-Diff), Medical Device Product Liability, Medication Drug Error, Nursing Home Abuse and Neglect, Nursing Home Care Issues, Patient Rights | RSS Feed
Elder Abuse and Neglect Blogs, How to Identify Abuse and Neglect

Elder Abuse and Neglect Blogs, How to Identify Abuse and Neglect

How to Identify Elder Abuse?

Published On: 30th November 2012 HOW TO IDENTIFY ELDER ABUSE AND NEGLECT

Introduction – Identify Elder Abuse There is an increasing trend is towards providing care in a home like environment whenever possible. There is a wide spectrum of housing for elderly and disabled persons with an increasing number of campus models where people can remain as independent as possible and as their medical needs increase they can have increasing medical supervision and attention without leaving the community. Identify elder abuse and neglect which is often the result of misplacement of an individual who has higher care or supervision needs than the provider or facility is able to offer.

Despite the trend for people who need long term care to get that care in their communities, there will always be a need for nursing homes for those who need or want to be cared for in a facility setting that is capable of providing professional services 24 hours a day. In fact, the demand for nursing home services will likely continue to increase with the aging of the baby-boomer generation. The population of persons over the age of 85 has increased significantly, and population projections by the US Census Bureau anticipate the over age 65 population to increase by 40% between 2010 and 2030. Projections indicate that the percentage of people in need of nursing home care will increase by up to 25% in the coming decades.

According to the best available estimates, between 1 and 2 million Americans age 65 or older have been injured, exploited, or otherwise mistreated by someone on whom they depended for care or protection. Estimates of the frequency of elder abuse range from 2% to 10% based on various sampling, survey methods, and case definitions. It is estimated that for every one case of elder abuse, neglect, exploitation, or self-neglect reported to authorities, about five more go unreported. Nursing homes are at the higher needs end of the spectrum and are often the focus of elder neglect due to the number of residents and the increased complexity of the their care needs.

Identify Elder Abuse – Report Suspected Abuse and Neglect

Click Here For Link To Report Abuse To Adult Protection

Click Here For Link To Report Abuse To Adult Protection

Many of the cases of nursing home neglect would be preventable with adequate numbers of well trained staff. It is important to hold nursing homes that fail to properly administrate the facility to maximize the quality of care for the residents, accountable. The goal is to create an opportunity for the facility to analyze the cause of incidents and make affirmative steps towards improvement while ensuring a financial basis for compliance.

If you have any questions about elder abuse or neglect contact Attorney Kenneth LaBore, 5001 Chowen Avenue South Minneapolis, MN 55410 KLaBore@MNNursinghomeneglect.com 612-743-9048 or toll free at 1-888-452-6589.

Disclaimer

Nursing Home Abuse and Neglect Lawyer Kenneth LaBore Offers Free Consultations and Serves Clients Throughout the State of Minnesota Call Toll Free at 1-888-452-6589

Nursing Home Abuse and Neglect Lawyer Kenneth LaBore Offers Free Consultations and Serves Clients Throughout the State of Minnesota Call Toll Free at 1-888-452-6589

 

Facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmail
Page 1 of 212