Archive for the ‘Burn Injuries’ Category


St John’s Lutheran Home Cited After Resident Scalded on Hot Coffee

Written By: Kenneth LaBore | Published On: 17th April 2019 | Category: Burn Injuries | RSS Feed
Resident at St. John’s Lutheran Home in Albert Lea after Resident Suffers 2nd Degree Scalding Burn Injuries from Hot Coffee

MDH Cites St John’s Lutheran Home after Resident Suffers 2nd Degree Burn

In a report from the Minnesota Department of Health it is alleged that a resident at St john’s Lutheran Home in Albert Lea was neglected when the facility neglected to develop and implement interventions to minimize the risk of injury for a resident who sustained a burn to the sternum.

Resident Suffers Burns to Chest and Abdomen

Neglect was substantiated. The resident required feeding assistance, but the facility did not change the care plan or implement interventions for hot beverages. The facility staff gave the resident hot coffee, which she spilled on herself, and sustained second degree burns across her chest and abdomen.

For a Free Consultation with an experienced elder abuse and neglect attorney call Kenneth LaBore at 612-743-9048.

Scalding and other burns are common in elder care facilities due to a lack of supervision, monitoring and assessing risks to residents. Most forms of elder abuse are preventable with proper care and supervision.

Report Suspected Elder Abuse

Click Here For Link To Report Abuse To Adult Protection
Click Here For Link To Report Abuse To Adult Protection

If you have concerns about care provided to a resident in a nursing home, assisted living or any other type of elder care provider contact Attorney Kenneth LaBore for a Free Consultation to discuss your legal rights and options.

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Talahi Nursing and Rehab Cited with Neglect after Resident Receives Burn

Written By: Kenneth LaBore | Published On: 14th January 2019 | Category: Burn Injuries | RSS Feed
Coffee Causing Second Degree Scalding Burn Injuries to Resident at Talahi Nursing and Rehab in St. Cloud Minnesota

MDH Cites Talahi Nursing and Rehab in St. Cloud after 2nd Degree Burns from Hot Coffee to Resident

In a report from the Minnesota Department of Health it is alleged that a client at Talahi Nursing and Rehab was neglected when the facility failed to follow the resident’s care plan that required assist of one for feeding. The resident sustained second degree burn from coffee spillage.

Failure to Provide Necessary Assistance Leads to Scalding Burns to Resident at Talahi Nursing and Rehab

Neglect was substantiated. The facility was responsible for the maltreatment. The facility neglected to provide the necessary services to ensure the resident’s safety when the resident was assessed to require extensive assistance for eating and drinking. A staff member handed the resident an uncovered cup of hot coffee. The resident spilled the hot coffee onto herself and sustained a second-degree burn to her thigh.

For a Free Consultation with an experienced elder abuse and neglect attorney call Kenneth LaBore at 612-743-9048.

A common form of neglect in elder care facilities involves injuries related to eating and drinking without proper assistance or supervision. Not only can resident’s choke on their food if not monitored, serious scalding and burn injuries can occur. Most forms of elder abuse are preventable with proper care and supervision.

Report Suspected Elder Abuse

Click Here For Link To Report Abuse To Adult Protection
Click Here For Link To Report Abuse To Adult Protection

If you have concerns about care provided to a resident in a nursing home, assisted living or any other type of elder care provider contact Attorney Kenneth LaBore for a Free Consultation to discuss your legal rights and options.

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Serious Scalding Burns to Resident at Auburn Manor

Written By: Kenneth LaBore | Published On: 9th December 2017 | Category: Burn Injuries, Uncategorized | RSS Feed
Resident Dies After Scalding Burn Injuries at Auburn Manor in Chaska
Resident Dies After Scalding Burn Injuries at Auburn Manor in Chaska

Auburn Manor Resident Suffers Water Scald Burns

In a report from the Minnesota Department of Health is alleged that a resident at Auburn Manor in Chaska was neglected when the resident wandered into the laundry room and was burned by hot water. The resident was transferred to the hospital. The hospital determined the resident sustained second degree burns to more than 20% of the body. The resident died the following day.

Resident at Auburn Manor Dies a Day After 20% Burns Over Entire Body

Based on a preponderance of evidence, neglect occurred when the facility failed to provide a safe environment and adequate supervision. According to the MDH report the facility staff left a locked laundry room door unattended and held open using a magnetic latch, and the resident entered into the laundry room. The resident was found lying in the cement catch basin which collects the hot waste water from the washing machine. The resident sustained second degree burns from hot water and died the next day as a result of the burns.

For a Free Consultation with an Experienced Elder Neglect Attorney call Kenneth LaBore Toll Free at 1-888-452-6589.

Of all the types of injuries suffered by residents in elder care facilities, burns are one of the most painful and life threatening. Burn injuries are also preventable with proper care and supervision.

Report Suspected Elder Abuse

Click Here For Link To Report Abuse To Adult Protection
Click Here For Link To Report Abuse To Adult Protection

If you suspect elder or vulnerable adult neglect or abuse contact the Minnesota Adult Abuse Reporting Center answered 24 hours a day, 7 days a week at 1-844-880-1574.

If you have concerns about care provided to a resident in a nursing home, assisted living or any other type of elder care provider contact Attorney Kenneth LaBore for a Free Consultation to discuss your legal rights and options.

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Knute Nelson Alexandria Neglect Heater Burns After Resident Falls from Bed

Written By: Kenneth LaBore | Published On: 25th March 2017 | Category: Burn Injuries, Failure to Provide CPR, Failure to Resond to Change in Condition, Fall Injuries, Financial Exploitation | RSS Feed

Fall with Burns Knute Nelson

Resident at Knute Nelson Alexandria Suffers Third Degree Burns After Prolonged Exposure to Radiator - Radiator Burns

Resident at Knute Nelson Alexandria Suffers Third Degree Burns After Prolonged Exposure to Radiator – Radiator Burns – Baseboard Heater Burn Injuries

Resident Falls and Suffers Burns at Knute Nelson Alexandria

In a report from the Minnesota Department of Health, dated April 22, 2016, it was alleged that Knute Nelson Alexandria was neglected when s/he fell and was burned by the baseboard heater in the resident’s room.

Knute Nelson Alexandria – Baseboard Radiator Burn Injuries

Based on a preponderance of the evidence, neglect occurred when the facility failed to assess the risk for burns from a baseboard heater in the resident’s room.  The resident rolled out of bed, came in contact with the heater, and sustained first, second, and third degree burns to the left hip and right foot including the heel and great toe.

The resident’s diagnoses included peripheral neuropathy or decreased feeling to the lower extremities.  The resident was capable of making his/her needs known to staff but required the assistance from others for decision making.  Due to declining health, the resident was provided with hospice care.  At the time of the fall, the resident required extensive assistance from two staff and a walker for ambulation, two staff for repositioning, transfers, toilet use, and a wheelchair for mobility for longer distances.  The resident had a history of falls at the facility and care plan interventions included keeping the call light and commonly used items within the resident’s reach, reminding the resident of safety precautions, providing proper footwear, and staying with the resident in the bathroom with toileting.  At the time of the fall, the facility had implemented an alarm that alerted staff of the resident’s attempt at self-transfers.

Early one morning, staff entered the resident’s room responding to the silent alarm notification.  The resident was lying between the bed and the baseboard heater his/her left hip and foot in contact with the heater.  The left hip burn was not measured but determined to be first degree.  The burn to the right foot measured 17 centimeters (cm) by 5 cm with weeping blisters present on the right heel and great toe.  The burn was second degree.  There was a third degree burn to a small area of the right great toe that measured .25 cm by 3 cm.  The area was white with hard skin.  The resident had an order for morphine sulfate for moderate to severe pain and staff provided the medication.

An interview with a staff member established when s/he found the resident on the floor touching the baseboard heater, s/he placed her/his leg between the heater and the resident to protect him/her from the heat.  The staff said the baseboard heater was hot and it was difficult to keep her/his leg on the heater until help arrived.

At the time of the fall, the resident’s bed was positioned parallel to the electric baseboard heater with a nightstand between the bed and heater.  There was approximately 19.5 inches between the resident’s bed and the heater.  During an onsite visit, the surface of the baseboard heater taken with a laser infrared device was 130 degrees Fahrenheit.  There was no prior assessment of the burn risk to the resident from the baseboard heater located in the resident’s room.

At the time of the incident, the facility had no policy or system in place to monitor the surface temperature of the baseboard heater.   Of the five resident rooms with the same type of baseboard heater, none of the beds were positioned close to the heater.

The resident passed away two days after the incident.

The death certificate indicated the primary cause of death was pneumonia.

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Nursing Home Neglect Failure to Provide CPR

Nursing Home Neglect Failure to Provide CPR at Knute Nelson Alexandria Minnesota

Substantiated Complaint Against Knute Nelson Alexandria – Medication Theft

In a report concluded on February 8, 2016, the Minnesota Department of Health cites the facility for exploitation – drug diversion.

It is alleged that a resident was financially exploited when a staff, alleged perpetrator (AP), took the resident’s medications for his/her own use.  The AP confessed to facility management to taking the medications.

Based on a preponderance of the evidence financial exploitation did occur when the alleged perpetrator (AP) took two tablets of Percocet (a narcotic used to treat moderate to severe pain) that belongs to the resident for the AP’s own personal use.

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Knute Nelson Alexandria Complaint Findings for Neglect – No CPR

In a report concluded on June 4, 2014, the Minnesota Department of Health cites Knute Nelson Alexandria for neglect of health care – failure to provide CPR.

It is alleged that neglect occurred when two licensed nurses did not initiate cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) when a resident was found not breathing and pulseless.  The resident’s advanced directives indicated that resident wanted CPR to be started.

Based on a preponderance of the evidence neglect occurred, when nursing staff failed to initiate cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) as directed by the resident’s signed resuscitation guideline form.

When MDH interviewed the physician/medical director stated that staff should have initiated CPR, called transferred the resident to the hospital.   The physician indicated that the facility policy directs staff to initiate CPR (unless designated as do not resuscitate/do not intubate) as the signs of death as difficult to gauge and are open to personal interpretation.

For more information from the Minnesota Department of Health, Office of Health Facility Complaints concerning nursing homes, assisted living and other elder care providers view resolved complaints at the MDH website.

If you have concerns about failure to provide CPR, burn injuries or any other form of elder abuse or neglect contact Elder Abuse and Neglect Attorney Kenneth LaBore toll free at 1-888-452-6589 or by email at KLaBore@MNnursinghomeneglect.com.

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Nursing Home Abuse and Neglect Lawyer Kenneth LaBore Offers Free Consultations and Serves Clients Throughout the State of Minnesota Call Toll Free at 1-888-452-6589

Nursing Home Abuse and Neglect Lawyer Kenneth LaBore Offers Free Consultations and Serves Clients Throughout the State of Minnesota Call Toll Free at 1-888-452-6589

 

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Heritage House of Milaca Neglect After Serious Burn Injuries

Written By: Kenneth LaBore | Published On: 28th February 2017 | Category: Burn Injuries, Elder Physical Abuse | RSS Feed

Serious Burn Injuries Suffered to Resident at Heritage House of Milaca

Serious Burn Injuries Suffered to Resident at Heritage House of Milaca

Heritage House of Milaca Neglect Due to Horrific Oxygen Burn Injuries

In a report dated February 3, 2017, the Minnesota Department of Health, alleged that a resident at Heritage House of Milaca was not supervised when the resident had oxygen and an oxygen mask on, lit up a cigarette and sustained burns to the side of the face and lungs. Staff extinguished the fire and called for emergency medical services. The resident was transferred to a hospital and then transferred to a burn unit at a second hospital.

Heritage House of Milaca Preventable Burns to Resident Using Oxygen

The MDH Substantiated Complaint of Neglect continues: based on a preponderance of evidence, neglect occurred when the staff failed to provide adequate supervision, and a client lit a cigarette, while using the liquid oxygen, and was burned.

The client had a diagnosis that included chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and schizophrenia.  The client received home care services and required assistance with oxygen management.  The client was a known smoker; however, the risks related to smoking with oxygen were not assessed, and the only clear rule from the home care provider was no smoking indoors.  The client was mostly compliant with removing the oxygen tank prior to going outside to smoke, but staff were aware the client sometimes smoke outside with the oxygen tank still attached, either turning the flow off or pulling the oxygen tubing away from his/her nose.

On the day of incident, a staff member assisted the client outside to get fresh air on the patio.  The client had his/her liquid oxygen tank attached to the wheelchair and was using a nasal cannula to deliver oxygen with the flow on.  The client received a cigarette from another client while on the patio.  When the client used the lighter, the oxygen tubing ignited.  The client removed the oxygen tubing from his/her nose and walked away from the wheelchair and the oxygen tank.  A staff member assisted the client inside through a door furthest from the fire, while another staff member called emergency services and extinguished the fire.  The client was given a cold wash cloth to apply to the burns on the side of the face and was transported to the hospital.

The client was transferred to a burn unit to treat his/her injuries.  The client had a second degree burns to the right side of the face including, the cheek, nose, eyelid, and eyebrow.  In addition, the client experienced soot and burn damage to his lungs and airway.  The client required intubation for two days and a feeding tube for ten days.   The client was hospitalized for sixteen days and discharged back to the home care provider with ongoing physical therapy, occupational therapy and speech therapy (for swallowing concerns).  The client continued to require ointment treatment to the facial burns.

The client was interviewed while in the hospital.  The client remained on tube feedings, and was on oxygen, and required treatment of the burns.  The client was lethargic, but able to arouse to answer questions.  The client stated s/he had forgotten to take his/her oxygen prior to lighting a cigarette.

Heritage House of Milaca – Report Abuse and Neglect

Click Here For Link To Report Abuse To Adult Protection

Click Here For Link To Report Abuse To Adult Protection

For more information from the Minnesota Department of Health, Office of Health Facility Complaints concerning nursing homes, assisted living and other elder care providers view resolved complaints at the MDH website.

Hold Negligent Providers Like Heritage House of Milaca Accountable

Attorney Kenneth LaBore has handled many preventable serious and fatal burn injuries, many due to the failure to follow safety policies and procedures related to oxygen use and smoking.    Burns can also happen from scalding water, heaters and electric pads and blankets and other ways.

If you have concerns about burn injuries or any other form of elder abuse or neglect contact Minnesota Elder Abuse Attorney Kenneth LaBore toll free at 612-743-9048 or toll free at 1-888-452-6589 or by email at KLaBore@MNnursinghomeneglect.com.

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Free Consultation on Issues of Elder Abuse and Neglect Serving all of Minnesota Toll Free 1-888-452-6589

Free Consultation on Issues of Elder Abuse and Neglect Serving all of Minnesota Toll Free 1-888-452-6589

_______________________________________________

 

Physical Abuse by Staff

Physical Abuse by Staff Heritage House of Milaca Minnesota

Heritage House of Milaca Complaint Findings for Exploitation

In a report concluded on January 31, 2011, the Minnesota Department of Health cites Heritage House of Milaca for exploitation by staff.

The allegation is abused based on the following:  Employee (A), alleged perpetrator (AP) grabbed Client #1’s wrist causing bruising on Client #1’s hand and wrist.

Substantiated Complaint Against Heritage House of Milaca

According to the National Center on Elder Abuse, elder abuse is a growing problem. While we don’t know all of the details about why abuse occurs or how to stop its spread, we do know that help is available for victims. Concerned people, like you, can spot the warning signs of a possible problem, and make a call for help if an elder is in need of assistance.

•Physical Abuse
•Sexual Abuse
•Emotional or Psychological Abuse
•Neglect
•Abandonment
•Financial or Material Exploitation
•Self-neglect

For more information from the Minnesota Department of Health, Office of Health Facility Complaints concerning nursing homes, assisted living and other elder care providers view resolved complaints at the MDH website.

If you have concerns about financial exploitation or any other form of elder abuse or neglect contact Minnesota Elder Abuse Attorney Kenneth LaBore at 612-743-9048 or toll free at 1-888-452-6589 or by email at KLaBore@MNnursinghomeneglect.com.

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Nursing Home Scalding Injury

Written By: Kenneth LaBore | Published On: 30th January 2017 | Category: Burn Injuries, Inadequate Staffing/Training | RSS Feed

Shower and Bath Scalding Injury Burns

Shower and Bath Scalding Injury Burns

Scalding Injury

There are many ways that nursing home residents suffer injury in a bathroom and shower, few are as preventable as scalding injuries due to hot water in the shower or bath.  Nursing homes are mandated to assess resident risks and to provide adequate care and supervision to prevent accidents.  Facilities need to check the water temperature on the water heaters and then again assure that the water is not dangerously hot for residents.  Like children, elder residents with thin skin and age related issues can burn even quicker than a younger person.  Anyone can suffer 3rd degree burn injuries in just seconds or a few minutes depending the temperature.

Hot Water Scalding Injury Burn Chart

Hot Water Scalding Injury Burn Chart

According to 42 CFR § 483.25, quality of care is a fundamental principle that applies to all treatment and care provided to facility residents. Based on the comprehensive assessment of a resident, the facility must ensure that residents receive treatment and care in accordance with professional standards of practice, the comprehensive person-centered care plan, and the resident’s choices, including but not limited to the following:

(d) Accidents.  The facility must ensure that—

(1) The resident environment remains as free of accident hazards as is possible; and

(2) Each resident receives adequate supervision and assistance devices to prevent accidents.

Scalding Injury Burns

Information About Burns from Hot Water Scalding Injury from the CDC, scalds, which are burns attributed to hot liquids or steam, account for 33%–58% of all patients hospitalized for burns in the United States. Adults aged ≥65 years have a worse prognosis than younger patients after scald burns because of age-related factors and comorbid medical conditions, and they are subject to more extensive medical treatment than younger adults. To estimate the number of emergency department (ED) visits for nonfatal scald burns among U.S. adults aged ≥65 years and describe their characteristics, CDC analyzed ED visit data from the National Electronic Injury Surveillance System All Injury Program (NEISS-AIP) for 2001–2006. This report summarizes the results, which indicated that adults aged ≥65 years made an estimated 51,700 initial visits to EDs for nonfatal scald burns during 2001–2006, for an average of 8,620 visits per year and an estimated average annual rate of 23.8 visits per 100,000 population. Two thirds of visits were made by women. Most (76%) of the nonfatal scald injuries occurred at home; 42% were associated with hot food and 30% with hot water or steam. The findings in this report highlight the need for effective scald-prevention programs targeted to older persons.

Scalding Injury Burn Attorney

If you have questions about elder burn injuries or any form nursing home abuse and neglect contact Kenneth LaBore for a free consultation.  There is no fee unless there is a verdict or settlement offer from the wrongdoer.  Mr. LaBore can be reached directly at 612-743-9048 or toll free at 1-888-452-6589 or by email at KLaBore@MNnursinghomeneglect.com.

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Hertitage Manor Cited After Burn Injury To Resident

Written By: Kenneth LaBore | Published On: 6th November 2016 | Category: Burn Injuries | RSS Feed

Burn of Resident on Heater at Heritage Manor in Chisholm Minnesota

Burn of Resident on Heater at Heritage Manor in Chisholm Minnesota

Resident is Burned by Heater at Heritage Manor in Chisholm Minnesota

In a report from the MDH dated July 12, 2016, it was alleged that the facility failed to provide adequate supervision when the resident’s foot rested on a heater and was burned.  The resident was hospitalized and is expected to die.

Burns of Resident at Heritage Manor Lead To Complaint of Neglect

Based on the preponderance of the evidence neglect occurred when the facility positioned the resident’s bed alongside a heat register and resident’s foot was burned.  In addition, the resident’s burn deteriorated over the next five days and the facility staff did not notify the physician in order to obtain treatment for the burn.  The burns because infected and the resident developed sepsis, which led to the resident’s death.

For more information from the Minnesota Department of Health, Office of Health Facility Complaints concerning nursing homes, assisted living and other elder care providers view resolved complaints at the MDH website.

If you have concerns about medication errors, improper use of medical equipment, falls or any other form of elder abuse or neglect contact Minnesota Elder Abuse Attorney Kenneth LaBore at 612-743-9048 or toll free at 1-888-452-6589 or by email at KLaBore@MNnursinghomeneglect.com.

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Resident at Gracepointe Cross Gables Suffers Coffee Burns

Written By: Kenneth LaBore | Published On: 27th September 2016 | Category: Burn Injuries | RSS Feed

Resident at Gracepointe Cross Gables East in Cambridge Suffers Scalding Burns from Hot

Resident at Gracepointe Cross Gables East in Cambridge Suffers Scalding Burns from Hot Coffee

Hot Coffee Leads to Burns of Resident at Gracepointe Cross Gables East in Cambridge Minnesota

In a report dated, August 1, 2016, the Minnesota Department of Health alleged that a resident was neglected when a facility staff failed to provide safe temperatures of food/drink.  The resident developed blisters when s/he spilled their hot coffee.

MDH Cites Gracepointe Cross After Resident Burnt By Coffee

Based on a preponderance of the evidence neglect occurred when staff gave the resident hot coffee without a lid on two separate occasions and the resident sustained first and second degree burns to the chest and abdomen.

The resident’s care plan directed staff to give the resident all fluids in a hard covered mug with hard lid to prevent spills.  Staff encouraged the resident to eat and drink independently.  The resident’s ability to eat and drink, and provided physical assistance when the cues were not effective.  The resident was severely cognitively impaired.

For more information from the Minnesota Department of Health, Office of Health Facility Complaints concerning nursing homes, assisted living and other elder care providers view resolved complaints at the MDH website.

If you have concerns about medication errors, improper use of medical equipment, falls or any other form of elder abuse or neglect contact Minnesota Elder Abuse Attorney Kenneth LaBore at 612-743-9048 or toll free at 1-888-452-6589 or by email at KLaBore@MNnursinghomeneglect.com.

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Allegation of Neglect at Fairview Home Care in Minneapolis

Written By: Kenneth LaBore | Published On: 6th September 2016 | Category: Burn Injuries | RSS Feed

Hot Water Scald Injuries to Resident at Fairview Home Care and Hospice in Minneapolis

Hot Water Scald Injuries to Resident at Fairview Home Care and Hospice in Minneapolis

Burn Injuries at Fairview Home Care in Minneapolis

In a report from the MDH dated August 2, 2016, it is alleged that a client was neglected when the agency staff soaked the client’s feet in too high temperature of water.  The client was transported to the hospital and referred to the Burn Unit with 2nd and 3rd degree burns to his/her feet.

Client Burned From Hot Water at Fairview Home Care and Hospice

Based on a preponderance of the evidence neglect occurred when the AP failed to provide adequate care and services for the client.  The AP did not follow agency protocol when s/he failed to adequately test the water temperature and have the client test the water temperature before soaking the client’s feet.  When the AP removed the client’s feet from the water, the client’s feet were red and blistered.  The client was hospitalized for third degree burns to both feet for 51 days.

For more information from the Minnesota Department of Health, Office of Health Facility Complaints concerning nursing homes, assisted living and other elder care providers view resolved complaints at the MDH website.

If you have concerns about medication errors, improper use of medical equipment, falls or any other form of elder abuse or neglect contact Minnesota Elder Abuse Attorney Kenneth LaBore at 612-743-9048 or toll free at 1-888-452-6589 or by email at KLaBore@MNnursinghomeneglect.com.

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Talahi Nursing Home St Cloud Cited with Neglect after Resident Suffers Burn from Coffee

Written By: Kenneth LaBore | Published On: 12th April 2015 | Category: Burn Injuries, Financial Exploitation | RSS Feed

Talahi Nursing Home St Cloud Resident Suffers Burns From Spilled Coffee


Talahi Nursing Home St Cloud Resident Suffers Second Degree Burn Injuries from Coffee

In a report from the MDH a client was neglected when the facility failed to follow the resident’s care plan that required assist of one for feeding. The resident sustained second degree burn from coffee spillage.

Neglect was substantiated. The facility was responsible for the maltreatment. The facility neglected to provide the necessary services to ensure the resident’s safety when the resident was assessed to require extensive assistance for eating and drinking. A staff member handed the resident an uncovered cup of hot coffee. The resident spilled the hot coffee onto herself and sustained a second-degree burn to her thigh.

Financial Exploitation

Financial Exploitation, Talahi Nursing Home St Cloud Substantiated Complaint at Talahi Nursing Home St Cloud Minnesota

Talahi Nursing Home St Cloud Complaint Findings for Exploitation

In a report concluded on October 28, 2013, the Minnesota Department of Health cites Talahi Nursing Home St Cloud  for exploitation by other.

It is alleged that financial exploitation occurred when staff forged a resident’s check.

Substantiated Complaint Against Talahi Nursing Home in St Cloud For Financial Exploitation

Based on a preponderance of evidence, financial exploitation did occur when the alleged perpetrator (AP) wrote a check, for $300.00 with the resident’s personal check blank.  The AP used the resident’s rubber signature stamp to endure the check.  The resident did not give the AP permission to write a check for $300.00 or to use the resident’s rubber signature stamp for endorsement.

The resident was alert and oriented to person, place, and time.  Due to the resident’s inability to perform the task of writing, the resident used a rubber signature stamp to sign documents including check blanks.

For more information from the Minnesota Department of Health, Office of Health Facility Complaints concerning nursing homes, assisted living and other elder care providers view resolved complaints at the MDH website.

If you have concerns about financial exploitation or any other form of elder abuse or neglect contact Minnesota Elder Abuse Attorney Kenneth LaBore toll free at 1-888-452-6589 or by email at KLaBore@MNnursinghomeneglect.com.

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