Archive for the ‘Home Health Care’ Category

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Circle Drive Manor Assisted Living West Concord

Written By: Kenneth LaBore | Published On: 21st February 2017 | Category: Home Health Care, Medication Administration Mistakes, Medication Drug Error | RSS Feed
Medication Error Giving Client Wrong Medication at Circle Drive Manor Assisted Living Leads to Hospitalization and Intubation Leads to Hospitalization and Intubation

Medication Error Giving Client Wrong Medication at Circle Drive Manor Assisted Living Leads to Hospitalization and Intubation Leads to Hospitalization and Intubation

Circle Drive Manor Assisted Living West Concord Allegations of Neglect After Wrong Medications

In a report from the Minnesota Department of Health, dated January 19, 2017,  there was an allegation that a client  at Circle Drive Manor Assisted Living West Concord was neglected when the facility administered an incorrect medication to the client and the client developed severe respiratory distress.

Circle Drive Manor Assisted Living West Concord Neglect Substantiated

Based on a preponderance of the evidence, neglect occurred when a client was given the wrong medication by the facility staff.  The client required hospitalization and intubation due to receiving the incorrect medication.  The facility had a pattern of presetting medications in a manner which made this issue likely to occur, the facility has been informed this practice was not safe, and the facility continued to fail to provide safe medication administration after this incident.

The client had a diagnosis that included chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD).  The client required oxygen use to maintain the client’s respiratory status.  The client received home care services and required assistance with all activities of daily living including medication and oxygen management.  The client had a history of respiratory infections and exacerbation of COPD.

The day of the incident, the client was not feeling well and requested to eat in his/her room instead of eating in the dining room.  The alleged perpetrator (AP) stated at about 11:00 a.m.. s/he prepared another client’s medication (gabapentin 600 milligrams), which was due at noon.   The AP stated that after setting up the medication, s/he delivered the client his/her lunch tray, but accidently placed the other client’s medication on the tray.  The AP continued to serve lunch to other clients in the dining room.  At 11:30 a.m., the AP went to the medication cart to administer the gabapentin and found that the medication cup with the pills was no longer there.  The AP verified s/he had signed his/her initials on the medication card, indicating s/he had set up the medication.  The AP stated s/he went back to the client’s room and noticed an empty medication cup on the client’s lunch tray.  The client was unresponsive.  Immediately, the AP called emergency medical services, and the client was sent to the hospital.

At the hospital, the client was intubated due to compromised respiratory status.  The client was extubated the following day and hospitalized for three days.  The hospital physician indicated the client would return to previous status with ongoing chronic health issues.  Upon discharge, the client returned to the home care provider.  The client subsequently declined in health status related to heart and lung diseases.  The client died approximately one month later.  The client’s death record indicated the client died from natural causes.

The client’s physician was interviewed and stated it was coincidental that the incident of the medication error occurred a month prior to the client’s death.  The physician stated the client had a severe heart blockage which was apparently the ultimate cause of death.

During an interview, the AP stated s/he made the medication error on a busy day.  The AP stated that because the client was underweight and frail, once s/he realized the error had occurred, s/he called the emergency services immediately to treat the client.

During an interview, a nurse who previously worked at the home care provider stated that both before and after this incident, unlicensed staff members would set up medications ahead of time, although they had been trained not to do so.   The nurse stated s/he had spoken to the owners of the facility, including the AP, regarding this pattern of unsafe medication administration, and the AP did not change the practice.  The nurse’s company terminated their contract with the facility due to this practice.

During the investigation, both the AP and another unlicensed staff member were observed setting up medications for multiple clients at the same time.  This included an incident where medications, scheduled to be administered at 5:00 p.m. and 8:00 p.m., were placed in medication cups between 3:50 p.m. and 4:20 p.m.  These medications were then locked in a tool chest for later administration to the clients.

Report Medication Errors and Other Elder Abuse and Neglect

Click Here For Link To Report Abuse To Adult Protection

Click Here For Link To Report Abuse To Adult Protection

For more information from the Minnesota Department of Health, Office of Health Facility Complaints concerning nursing homes, assisted living and other elder care providers view resolved complaints at the MDH website.

If you have concerns about being given the wrong medication or any other form of elder abuse or neglect contact Minnesota Elder Abuse Attorney Kenneth LaBore toll free at 612-743-9048 or toll free at 1-888-452-6589 or by email at KLaBore@MNnursinghomeneglect.com.

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Free Consultation on Issues of Elder Abuse and Neglect Serving all of Minnesota Toll Free 1-888-452-6589

Free Consultation on Issues of Elder Abuse and Neglect Serving all of Minnesota Toll Free 1-888-452-6589

 

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Everyday Living Cited with Neglect

Written By: Kenneth LaBore | Published On: 2nd February 2017 | Category: Financial Exploitation, Home Health Care | RSS Feed
Financial Exploitation of Client at Everyday Living When Theft of Gift Card

Financial Exploitation of Client at Everyday Living When Theft of Gift Card

Everyday Living Alleged Exploitation by Staff

In a report from the Minnesota Department of Health dated, November 23, 2016, it was alleged that a client at Everyday Living in South Saint Paul, was financially exploited when the alleged perpetrator (AP) stole the client’s gift and used it for her own personal use.

Everyday Living Substantiated Theft of Client Gift Cards

Based on a preponderance of evidence, financial exploitation occurred when the alleged perpetrator (AP) used the client’s gift care without permission.

The client received comprehensive home care services from the provider according to a service agreement and care plan.

The client was interviewed and said s/he noticed a gift card s/he recently received from a family member was missing.  The client called the family member.  The family member called the store where the gift card was issued, and learned the gift card had recently been used at the store.  The client and a facility staff member went to the store to see if they could determine who had used the gift card.  The client described the AP to an employee at the store, showed the employee a picture of the AP, and the employee identified the AP, as the person who used the client’s gift card.  The client said s/he did not give or sell the gift card to the AP.

The family member was interviewed and said s/he recently gave the client a gift card to an area store.  The client called and said the gift card was missing, so the family member called the store to see if the gift card had been spent.    The family member learned from the store the gift card had been spent recently, and s/he called the client and told the client to get the police involved.

Interview with a staff member revealed the client recently received a gift card from a family member.  The next day the client told him/her s/he was missing the gift card.  The staff member said the client called the family member and learned the gift card had recently been spent at the store where the gift card was issued.  The staff member and the client went to the store.  The client described the AP to an employee at the store, showed the employee a picture of the AP, and employee identified the AP as the person who used the client’s gift card.

The police were contacted by the client.  The police investigation was forwarded to the city attorney for formal charges against the AP.

The AP was interviewed, and admitted she used the client’s gift card at the store for his/her own personal use.

For more information about how to get accountability for elder abuse and neglect related injuries call Kenneth LaBore for a free consultation at his direct number at 612-743-9048 or toll free at 1-888-452-6589 or by email at KLaBore@MNnursinghomeneglect.com.  There is no fee unless a there is a verdict or settlement offer from the wrongdoer.

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Hugo GW LLC Cited by MDH For Complaints of Abuse and Neglect

Written By: Kenneth LaBore | Published On: 2nd February 2017 | Category: Elder Physical Abuse, Home Health Care | RSS Feed
Hugo GW, LLC also known as Hugo Gracewood LLC Cited with Substantiated Abuse of Clients

Hugo GW, LLC also known as Hugo Gracewood LLC Cited with Substantiated Abuse of Clients

Hugo GW, LLC Allegation of Abuse by Staff

In a report from the Minnesota Department of Health dated August 24, 2016, it is alleged that Hugo Gracewood, LLC clients are being abused when the alleged perpetrators treated clients in a disparaging and humiliating manner, taking photos and video of clients indicating illicit behavior.

Substantiated Complaint of Abuse of a Client at Hugo GW, LLC

Based on  a preponderance of the evidence, two clients were abused when staff took disparaging and humiliating videos of clients and shared them via text and social media.  Four alleged perpetrators were identified.  AP #1 took and shared videos, AP #2 witnessed video staging, received and shared video, AP #3 was present when video was recorded and received video, and AP #4 sent video.  Two videos were reviewed in the investigation and two more videos were discussed in interviews.

Client #1 received services due to diagnoses that included dementia, and required assistance for activities of daily living (ADLs).  Client #1 was unable to report maltreatment related to memory impairment.

Client #2 received services due to diagnoses that included Alzheimer’s disease, and required assistance with all ADLs.  Client #2 was unable to report maltreatment due to severe memory impairment.

Video #1 was obtained from a staff cell phone belonging to AP #3.  Video #1 portrayed client #2 dressed in a white tee shirt, sitting in wheelchair at a table.  A white powdered substance was spread under the client’s nose and the same white powdered substance was on the table placed in three straight lines.  Client #2 was experiencing arm tremors.  The song “Cocaine” by Eric Clapton was playing in the background.

Video #2 was obtained from a staff member who received it from AP #4 via social media.  Video #2 was dark and difficult to see.  However, client #1 was heard yelling in distress.

During and interview with a staff member, s/he stated the AP #1 showed him/her two videos (video #1 and video #3) of client #2, on AP’s personal cell phone.  The description of the first video was consistent with video #1: client #2 was sitting in a wheelchair at a table, and had powered sugar on the table in lines and under his/her nose.  The staff member stated it made it look like the client was using cocaine.  The staff member stated that the video #3 portrayed client #2 holding and empty alcohol bottle while another unidentified staff member was pushing the client’s wheelchair, with “rock music” playing in the background.  The staff member stated AP #1 had said s/he found the empty alcohol bottle, brought it into the home care provider, and gave it to client #2 to hold.

During an interview with another staff member, s/he stated s/he had seen two different videos (video #2 and video #4) of client #1.  The staff member stated AP #4 had sent him/her a message via social media with video #2 stating that client #1 is mad and will not let anyone help him/her.  The staff member stated the client #1 was sitting on the toilet, yelling at staff in video #2.  The staff member stated video #4 was viewed on AP #1’s personal cell phone.  S/he stated video #4 showed client #1 on the toilet and AP #3 in the bathroom with client #1 while AP #1 recorded.  The staff member stated client #1 said “you guys are going to hell” and either AP #1 or AP #3 said “we’ll see you there.”

An interview with AP #1 was attempted.  A subpoena was sent to AP #1.  AP #1 failed to respond or attend the scheduled interview.

An interview with AP #2 was completed.  AP #2 stated s/he worked with AP #1 on the evening shift when video #1 of client #2 was taken.  AP #2 stated that after s/he finished his/her final rounds, s/he saw client #2 sitting at the table in the common area.  S/he stated the powdered sugar was on the table and looked like cocaine.  AP #2 stated that AP #1 sent him/her video #1 via text message, and then s/he sent it to AP #3.  AP #2 stated s/he knew it was not acceptable to take videos of clients, but did not report to management because s/he did not want to get involved.

During an interview with AP #3, s/he stated s/he received video #1 of client #2 in April 2016 from AP #2 via text message.  AP #3 stated AP #1 and AP #2 were working the night when video #1 was taken.  AP #3 stated video #1 was of client #2 with powdered sugar on his/her nose and lines of powdered sugar to look like cocaine.  AP #3 stated s/he has seen a video of client #2 with a bottle of vodka that AP #1 had brought into the home care provider and gave to client #2.  AP #3 stated s/he knew taking a video of a client was wrong, but acknowledged s/he did not report the incident.  AP #3 stated s/he has never seen a picture or video of client #1 sitting on the toilet and has never sent any pictures of a client sitting on the toilet.

An interview with AP #4 was completed.  AP #4 stated s/he never sent a video of a client via social media and does not know why some one would say s/he had.

During an interview with the House Manager, s/he stated s/he was aware of inappropriate picture taking occurring on the evening shift while s/he was a lead caregiver.  S/he stated another staff member reported AP #1 sent a picture of one of the clients through text message.  The Housing Manager stated s/he confronted AP #1 who said s/he had taken pictures of the clients.  The Housing Manager stated s/he reported it to the housing manager at the time, and the Housing Manager instructed him/her to the staff on the cellphone policy.  S/he looked for an Internal Investigation or vulnerable adult report and neither was found to have been completed by the home care provider.

During an interview with the registered nurse, s/he stated s/he was unaware of staff taking pictures or videos of clients.

During an interview with client #1, s/he was confused and upset.  Client #1 could not recall if any photographs or videos had been taken of him/her.

During an interview with client #1’s family member, the family member stated s/he has not heard client #1 complain about staff nor seen any staff take pictures or video of client #1.  However, the family member stated s/he only visits during the day.

An interview with client #2 was attempted, however client #2 was asleep and was unable to be aroused for the interview.

During an interview with client #2’s family member, the family stated that client #2 is unable to recall events.  The family member stated s/he was not aware of any videos or pictures being taken by staff.

To get accountability for physical or other abuse to elders all Kenneth LaBore for a free consultation at 612-743-9048 or toll free at 1-888-452-6589 or by email at KLaBore@MNnursinghomeneglect.com.

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MDH Cites Hugo GW LLC For Physical Abuse After Client Assaults Another

MDH Cites Hugo GW LLC For Physical Abuse After Client Assaults Another

Hugo GW LLC cited after Client Hits and Pushed other Client

In a report concluded on May 5, 2015, the Minnesota Department of Health cites Hugo GW LLC, it is alleged that neglect of supervision occurred, when Client #1 hit and pushed down Client #2, causing injury to her/his arms and knuckles.  Facility is aware of this, but does not have the protocols in place to prevent reoccurrence.

Substantiated Neglect of Supervision Against Hugo GW LLC

Based on the preponderance of the evidence, neglect of supervision occurred when staff failed to reassess Client #1’s aggressive behaviors in a timely manner and implement interventions to assist in keeping the clients of the facility save.

The facility was a locked memory care unit where 25 clients resided.  The facility staffed three unlicensed staff persons to pass medications and assist with personal care on the day and evening shifts.  Two unlicensed persons worked the overnight shift.

Client #1 had dementia, ambulated independently and wandered throughout the facility.  The client had aggressive behaviors towards staff and other clients.  Interventions for staff to follow when the client displayed aggressive behaviors, were to remove the client and/or others from the situation, approach in a calm manner and medication management.

For more information from the Minnesota Department of Health, Office of Health Facility Complaints concerning nursing homes, assisted living and other elder care providers view resolved complaints at the MDH website.

If you have concerns about physical abuse or any other form of elder abuse or neglect contact Minnesota Elder Abuse Attorney Kenneth LaBore at 1-888-452-6589 or by email at KLaBore@MNnursinghomeneglect.com.

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Selecting an Elder Care Facility

Written By: Kenneth LaBore | Published On: 19th January 2017 | Category: Caregivers Resources, Home Health Care, Housing With Services Care Issues | RSS Feed
Selecting an Elder Care Facility in Minnesota

Selecting an Elder Care Facility in Minnesota

Resources for Selecting an Elder Care Facility

Selecting an elder care facility is a difficult and import decision.  The resident or family member needs to consider many factors including the location, costs, payment sources such as Medicaid and Minnesota Elder Waiver, and probably most importantly the care needs of the resident and the services offered by the provider.

Another important issue is to consider the quality of care the potential nursing home, assisted living, memory care provider, home care provider, group home or other care or service provider focused on elder and vulnerable adult clients.

Additional Resources for Selecting and Elder Care Facility

Before selecting an elder care provider you want to review the past Medicaid surveys, as well as the Minnesota Department of Health, Office of Health Facility Complaints findings for the facility you are considering.  You may also want to make sure the facility is not on the Medicare Special Focus Facility list of providers with deficiencies well above the above in average pertaining to quality of care provided to residents.

It is also important to be well versed in the Minnesota and Federal Resident Rights regulations designed to protect nursing home and other elder care vulnerable adults and residents.

If you suspect any type of injuries or harm from elder abuse or neglect, report it immediately.

Click here for more selecting an elder care facility or choosing a nursing home.

Also see Minnesota Choosing a Facility from the MDH, which has links to more information including: finding licensed facilities and providers, Minnesota Nursing Home Report Card, a statewide source of information Minnesota Help, Medicare Compare for Home Health Care Providers and Medicare Compare for Nursing Homes.

In some cases information on facilities can be found at U.S.News, Find Nursing Home Rating.

The Center for Disease Control and Prevention, CDC, information on Nursing Homes, Assisted Living and Long Term Care Facilities.

The Minnesota Attorney General also provides information on Selection of Nursing Home.

Finally, The Center for Medicare Medicaid Services, CMS, Offers a Nursing Home Selection Checklist covering many important care and service related issues before choosing a facility.

For more information from the Minnesota Department of Health, Office of Health Facility Complaints concerning nursing homes, assisted living and other elder care providers view resolved complaints at the MDH website.

If you need more information about selecting an elder care facility or have concerns about medication errors, improper use of medical equipment, falls or any other form of elder abuse or neglect contact Minnesota Elder Abuse Attorney Kenneth LaBore at 612-743-9048 or toll free at 1-888-452-6589 or by email at KLaBore@MNnursinghomeneglect.com.

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Client of Gondola Group Home Care Falls in Shower When Left Unattended

Written By: Kenneth LaBore | Published On: 15th January 2017 | Category: Fall Injuries, Home Health Care | RSS Feed
Head Injury After Client Falls in Shower at Gondola Group in Rosemount

Head Injury After Client Falls in Shower at Gondola Group in Rosemount

Substantiated Complaint of Neglect Against Gondola Group

In a report from the Minnesota Department of Health dated October 18, 2016, it was alleged that a client of Gondola Group in Rosemount was neglected when s/he had a fall in shower and sustained several vertebrae fractures.

Fall in Shower Leads to MDH Complaint

Based upon a preponderance of the evidence, neglect is substantiated.  The home care provider staff left a client unattended in the shower, and the client fell and experienced cervical fractures.

The client was admitted to the home care provider with diagnoses that included dementia, syncope with collapse, and cerebral ischemia (lack of oxygen to the brain).  The client had a known history of fainting related to heart problems.  The client’s nursing assessment indicated the client required assistance of one person for transfers, ambulation, and showering.

The facility policy required staff members providing showers to remain in the bathroom during the shower, if the client was a full assist.  The staff were required to review each client’s service plan.  The service plans were accessible to staff.

The day of the incident, the client was sitting on a shower chair in a bath tub with a raised edge.  The client requested to wash his/her own body and hair.  The staff member handed the client a wash cloth, then left the client unattended in the shower.  The staff member stated s/he left to go into the client’s room, which was located across the hallway from the bathroom, to gather clothes.  The client got out of the shower unassisted, began to dry her/himself, and fell.  When the staff member heard a loud noise and entered the bathroom, s/he saw the client lying on the floor bleeding from the back of the head.  The staff member pressed a towel to the head wound, called 911, and send the client to the hospital.  The staff member notified the registered nursing and the client’s family.

At the hospital, the client was found to have neck fractures and was treated with surgery, and required pins for stability and neck brace.  The client returned to the home care provider after his/her hospitalization.  The client required daily pin care, and the brace restricted head and upper body movement.  Three months later, the pins were removed and client remained in a neck brace.

During an interview, the client stated s/he was often left alone during showers.  S/he stated staff usually helped him/her onto the shower chair, turned on the water, and then would leave to gather his/her things.  On the day of the incident, the client stated s/he remembers falling head first, but then could not remember anything else until s/he was at the hospital.

During staff interviews, a nurse stated s/he told staff not to leave clients alone in the shower and to only provide showers when two staff members were in the facility, but s/he also said a/he was aware that some staff were providing showers  to clients when there was only one staff member on duty.

During an interview, the client’s family member stated the injuries from the fall had been difficult on the client.  The family member explained that while the client was in the neck brace with pins, s/he had to lay in one position and was uncomfortable for three months.  Since the client was unable to get up unassisted, the family member stated s/he provided the client with a bell to alert staff of his/her needs.  The client has had to be in a hard neck brace for another three months and a soft neck brace for an additional three months.

During an interview, the alleged perpetrator (AP) stated the client liked doing tasks independently and often asked to wash his/her own hair and body.  S/he  stated usually the client would wait until the shower until staff could assist the client out.  The AP state s/he knew s/he was supposed to stay with the client, but was not aware , at the time of the incident, of the client’s fall risk and history of fainting.

For more information from the Minnesota Department of Health, Office of Health Facility Complaints concerning nursing homes, assisted living, home care and other elder care providers view resolved complaints at the MDH website.

If you have concerns about improper use of medical equipment, falls or any other form of elder abuse or neglect contact Minnesota Elder Abuse Attorney Kenneth LaBore at 612-743-9048 or toll free at 1-888-452-6589 or by email at KLaBore@MNnursinghomeneglect.com.

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Elders Home New York Mills Neglect – Medication Theft

Written By: Kenneth LaBore | Published On: 12th March 2015 | Category: Bed Rail Strangulation and Asphyxiation, Financial Exploitation, Home Health Care, Wrongful Death | RSS Feed
Exploitation Drug Diversion - Medication Theft, Neglect of Health Care at Elders Home New York Mills Minnesota

Exploitation Drug Diversion – Medication Theft, Neglect of Health Care at Elders Home New York Mills Minnesota

Elders Home New York Mills Complaint Findings for Exploitation

In a report concluded on May 22, 2014, the Minnesota Department of Health cites Elders Home New York Mills for exploitation – drug diversion.

It is alleged that exploitation occurred when the alleged perpetrator (AP) took narcotic medications from Residents #1, #2, #3, #4, #5, #6, and #7.

Elders Home New York Mills Complaint Findings for Neglect, Bed Rail Entrapment

In another report concluded on April 16, 2014, the Minnesota Department of Health cites Elders Home New York Mills for neglect of health care.

It is alleged that neglect occurred related to a resident who was found deceased, positioned half way out of bed with the side rails out.

For more information from the Minnesota Department of Health, Office of Health Facility Complaints concerning nursing homes, assisted living and other elder care providers view resolved complaints at the MDH website.

If you have concerns about injury from medical equipment, Minnesota Nursing Home Wrongful Death Attorney, or any other form of elder abuse or neglect contact Minnesota Elder Abuse and Neglect Attorney Kenneth LaBore at 1-888-452-6589 or by email at KLaBore@MNnursinghomeneglect.com.

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Nursing Home Abuse and Neglect Lawyer Kenneth LaBore Offers Free Consultations and Serves Clients Throughout the State of Minnesota Call Toll Free at 1-888-452-6589

Nursing Home Abuse and Neglect Lawyer Kenneth LaBore Offers Free Consultations and Serves Clients Throughout the State of Minnesota Call Toll Free at 1-888-452-6589

 

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Ecumen Home Care Shoreview Neglect – Resident Eloped and Wandered

Written By: Kenneth LaBore | Published On: 12th March 2015 | Category: Financial Exploitation, Home Health Care, Lost Resident Wandering Elopement | RSS Feed
Neglect of Health Care Home Care Neglect

Health Care Home Care Neglect at Ecumen Home Care Shoreview

Ecumen Home Care Shoreview Neglect Complaint Findings for Neglect

In a report concluded on August 3, 2012, the Minnesota Department of Health cites Ecumen Home Care Shoreview for neglect of health care.

The allegation is neglect based on the following: Client #1 was not adequately supervised and eloped from the facility on more than one occasion because a wander guard was not secured.  In addition the client’s toenails were not cared for resulting in the toenail growing into the underside of the client’s foot.

Ecumen Home Care Shoreview Neglect – Wandering and Elopement

In another report concluded on June 4, 2011, the Minnesota Department of Health cites Ecumen Home Care Shoreview for exploitation by staff.

The allegation is exploitation based on the following: a nurse, alleged perpetrator (AP) took the narcotic pain medication Oxycodone and replaced it with an alternate medication.  As a result, Client #1’s, #2’s, #3’s and #4’2 symptoms of pain were not adequately relieved.

For more information from the Minnesota Department of Health, Office of Health Facility Complaints concerning nursing homes, assisted living and other elder care providers view resolved complaints at the MDH website.

If you have concerns about neglect of health care, financial exploitation, wandering/elopement or any other form of elder abuse or neglect contact Elder Abuse and Neglect Attorney Kenneth LaBore toll free at 1-888-452-6589 or by email at KLaBore@MNnursinghomeneglect.com

Disclaimer

Nursing Home Abuse and Neglect Lawyer Kenneth LaBore Offers Free Consultations and Serves Clients Throughout the State of Minnesota Call Toll Free at 1-888-452-6589

Nursing Home Abuse and Neglect Lawyer Kenneth LaBore Offers Free Consultations and Serves Clients Throughout the State of Minnesota Call Toll Free at 1-888-452-6589

 

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Country Home Comforts Brook Park Neglect Substantiated

Written By: Kenneth LaBore | Published On: 10th March 2015 | Category: Bed Sores and Pressure Ulcers, Home Health Care, Medication Drug Error | RSS Feed
Nursing Home Neglect Health Care Medications

Nursing Home Neglect Health Care Medications

Country Home Comforts Brook Park Complaint Findings for Medications

In a report concluded on July 5, 2012, the Minnesota Department of Health cites Country Home Comforts Brook Park for medication administration.

It is alleged that the licensee does not have an adequate medication system in place based on the following: staff are administering medications to clients without training by a registered nurse, staff are being asked to sign off medications for other staff who actually administered the medication and medication errors are not being documented properly for review by the registered nurse.  In addition, the medications are not stored in a locked area.

Country Home Comforts Brook Park Complaint Findings for Neglect – Pressure Ulcers

In another report concluded on May 10, 2012, the Minnesota Department of Health cites Country Home Comforts Brook Park for neglect of health care.

The allegation is neglect based on the following: Client #1 was transferred to the hospital due to a loss of consciousness.  While at the hospital, the client was noted to have pressure ulcers on his feet and inability to swallow.

For more information from the Minnesota Department of Health, Office of Health Facility Complaints concerning nursing homes, assisted living and other elder care providers view resolved complaints at the MDH website.

If you have concerns about medication errors, pressure ulcers, neglect of health care or any other form of elder abuse or neglect contact Minnesota Elder Abuse Attorney Kenneth LaBore at 1-888-452-6589 or by email at KLaBore@MNnursinghomeneglect.com

Disclaimer

Nursing Home Abuse and Neglect Lawyer Kenneth LaBore Offers Free Consultations and Serves Clients Throughout the State of Minnesota Call Toll Free at 1-888-452-6589

Nursing Home Abuse and Neglect Lawyer Kenneth LaBore Offers Free Consultations and Serves Clients Throughout the State of Minnesota Call Toll Free at 1-888-452-6589

 

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Clarkfield Home Health Clarkfield Neglect – Nursing Care

Written By: Kenneth LaBore | Published On: 9th March 2015 | Category: Home Health Care | RSS Feed
Nursing Care, Home Care Elder Neglect

Nursing Care, Home Care Elder Neglect, Clarkfield Home Health Clarkfield

Clarkfield Home Health Clarkfield Complaint Findings for Nursing Care

In a report concluded on October 28, 2013, the Minnesota Department of Health cites Clarkfield Home Health Clarkfield for nursing care.

Substantiated Neglect Clarkfield Home Health Clarkfield

According to Minnesota Statute 148.171, the Nurse Practice Act, Subd. 8a., “Monitoring” means the periodic inspection by a registered nurse or licensed practical nurse of a delegated or assigned nursing task or activity and includes: (1) watching during the performance of the task or activity; (2) periodic checking and tracking of the progress of the task or activity being performed; (3) updating a supervisor on the progress or completion of the task or activity performed; and (4) contacting a supervisor as needed for direction and consultation.

For more information from the Minnesota Department of Health, Office of Health Facility Complaints concerning nursing homes, assisted living and other elder care providers view resolved complaints at the MDH website.

If you have concerns about nursing care or any other form of elder abuse or neglect contact Home Care Abuse and Neglect Attorney Kenneth LaBore at 612-743-9048 or toll free at 1-888-452-6589 or by email at KLaBore@MNnursinghomeneglect.com.

Disclaimer

Nursing Home Abuse and Neglect Lawyer Kenneth LaBore Offers Free Consultations and Serves Clients Throughout the State of Minnesota Call Toll Free at 1-888-452-6589

Nursing Home Abuse and Neglect Lawyer Kenneth LaBore Offers Free Consultations and Serves Clients Throughout the State of Minnesota Call Toll Free at 1-888-452-6589

 

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Medical Foster Homes a Nursing Home Alternative in Minneapolis

Written By: Kenneth LaBore | Published On: 22nd November 2014 | Category: Facilities - Nursing Homes, Home Health Care, Housing With Services Care Issues | RSS Feed
Elderly Gentleman, Veteran, Nursing Home Resident

Elderly Gentleman, Veteran, Nursing Home Resident, Medical Foster Homes

Medical Foster Homes Are Option For Some

There are many nursing homes throughout Minneapolis and St. Paul. It may be fair to say that all of them have veterans living within them they called medical foster homes.

The reason why veterans live in nursing homes is because living at home can become too difficult for them. The one way that they are able to get the care that they need is by receiving care in nursing homes and other institutions.

Minneapolis Medical Foster Homes

But Minneapolis has something a bit different for veterans and they are called “Medical Foster Homes.”

In these homes, veterans are able to live with skilled families that are very loving. These homes are state licensed and inspected by the VA. The family provides the veteran’s daily care with the assistance of health care professionals.

A major difference is the amount of personal involvement that the families have in the veterans that they house. This reduces the chances of there being any sort of negligence or physical or elder sexual abuse. The families within these homes are also able to handle the responsibility, as they have very few individuals to take care of.

One Korean War veteran chose to enter a medical foster home. Like many other veterans, he likes to reminisce over photos from the time he served. He said he had some good memories of his time serving and that there were some rather nice ports that he visited.

Of course, his life has changed a lot since then.

Being someone with medical problems and no family, he was forced into nursing homes. When he heard about Medical Foster Homes, he was ready to give it a try. He says it is very interesting having a family.

The family receives help from the VA staff in ensuring the veteran and the other veterans in the program receive individualized care.

One caregiver was noted as saying that out of all of the careers she has had in the past, this is the only one that makes her feel as if she is making a difference in someone’s life. She compares it to being in a blended family.

For veterans that do have families, there is an open door policy that welcomes them.

One woman said she was going downhill while she was being cared for in her home. Her sister would come visit her and help take care of her when possible, but the 5 ½ hour drive one way was a bit overwhelming. Placing the woman in a Medical Foster Home resulted in improved care and a better quality of life. Before she moved into the home, she weighed just less than 70 pounds and is now over 100 pounds.

So far, the Minneapolis VA Medical Foster Home Program has 22 homes with at least three veterans living in each home. This is the largest program of its kind in the country.

There is a monthly fee that has to be paid in order to stay in a Medical Foster Home. This fee is paid with a combination of the veteran’s Social Security, VA and private income. The result is their housing, food, and basic needs being taken care of every single day.

Report Suspected Abuse and Neglect in Medical Foster Homes

Click Here For Link To Report Abuse To Adult Protection

Click Here For Link To Report Abuse To Adult Protection

For more information from the Minnesota Department of Health, Office of Health Facility Complaints concerning nursing homes, assisted living and other elder care providers view resolved complaints at the MDH website.

If you have concerns about any form of elder abuse or neglect contact Minnesota Elder Abuse Attorney Kenneth LaBore toll free at 612-743-9048 or toll free at 1-888-452-6589 or by email at KLaBore@MNnursinghomeneglect.com.

Disclaimer

Free Consultation on Issues of Elder Abuse and Neglect Serving all of Minnesota Toll Free 1-888-452-6589

Free Consultation on Issues of Elder Abuse and Neglect Serving all of Minnesota Toll Free 1-888-452-6589

 

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