Martin Luther Care Center Bloomington Neglect Substantiated

Written By: Kenneth LaBore | Published On: 11th January 2016
MDH Substantiated Complaint Against Martin Luther Care Center for Staff Member Who Stole Medications from Resident

MDH Substantiated Complaint Against Martin Luther Care Center for Staff Member Who Stole Medications from Resident

Martin Luther Care Center Bloomington Complaint Substantiated for Financial Exploitation Drug Diversion

In a report concluded on April 3, 2015, the Minnesota Department of Health cites Martin Luther Care Center Bloomington is alleged to have a alleged perpetrator took resident’s pain medications.

Based on the preponderance of the evidence financial exploitation did occur when the Alleged Perpetrator (AP) stole 24 Tramadol tablets from an unknown number of residents for his/her personal use.

For more information from the Minnesota Department of Health, Office of Health Facility Complaints concerning nursing homes, assisted living and other elder care providers view resolved complaints at the MDH website.

If you have concerns about financial exploitation or any other form of elder abuse or neglect contact Minnesota Elder Abuse Attorney Kenneth LaBore toll free at 1-888-452-6589 or by email at KLaBore@MNnursinghomeneglect.com.

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Falls and Resulting Head Injury

Falls and Resulting Head Injury at Martin Luther Care Center Bloomington Minnesota

Martin Luther Care Center Bloomington Complaint Findings for Neglect – Falls

In a report concluded on February 12, 2015, the Minnesota Department of Health cites Martin Luther Care Center Bloomington for neglect – falls – health care.

It was alleged that a resident was neglected when the resident had numerous falls and staff failed to provide adequate medical care after a fall resulting in a fatal cerebral hemorrhage.

The preponderance of evidence established neglect occurred when facility staff failed to initiate adequate safety interventions in response to resident’s repeated falls.  The resident sustained a non-survivable brain injury after falling four times in three days.

The resident had a history of falls and balance problems.  The resident was confused and visually impaired.  The resident was assessed to be at high risk for falls.  The resident’s care plan did not address the resident’s confusion, failure to use the call light appropriately, mobility needs, toileting needs, or how often staff were to check on the resident, who was known to self-transfer without calling for staff assistance.  The care plan interventions indicated that staff were to anticipate and plan for the resident’s needs and the resident was to wear gripper socks.

The resident resided in the TCU for six days.  The resident demonstrated unsafe behavior during the first three days in TCU, including multiple attempts to transfer without staff assistance and unable to use call light.  The resident’s behavior pattern continued and resident fell four times during the next three days in TCU.

All four falls occurred between 10:35 p.m. and 4:10 a.m.  During three of the falls, the resident got out of bed because s/he needed to use the toilet.  During the other fall, staff left the resident unattended on the resident’s bathroom toilet  and the resident tried to self-transfer from the toilet to the wheelchair.  The resident struck his/her head during all four falls.

The resident sustained two hematomas on the back of the head which occurred during the first three falls.  Multiple nurses were aware of the resident’s falling pattern, injuries and had conducted neurological assessments of the resident.  Nursing did not inform the physician or the resident’s repeated falls or that the resident had sustained head injuries after falling.

Nurses did not evaluate the root cause of the resident’s falls, implement appropriate preventive measures to meet the resident’s safety needs, or contact the physician regarding the resident’s clinical status.  After the resident fell and struck his/her head the fourth time, the resident’s blood pressure was elevated significantly, consistent with increased intracranial pressure.  The physician was not called.  The resident’s blood pressure remained elevated for the next three hours.  The physician was not called.  Rather, the resident was placed in bed and was not checked on for 2 1/2 hours, at which time the resident complained of a headache.  The resident was given Tylenol.  The resident’s blood pressure was not-rechecked.  The physician was not called.  A half hour later, the resident vomited.  The resident’s blood pressure was re-checked and elevated higher than previously.  The physician was contacted at time six hours after the resident fell.  The physician directed staff to send the resident to the hospital.  By the time the paramedics arrived the resident was unresponsive.

The resident arrived at the hospital in critical condition, with a brain injury that was deemed catastrophic and not survivable.  The resident died within two hours of hospital arrival.

The resident’s death certificate indicated that the resident’s cause of death was a subdural hemorrhage due to a fall.

For more information from the Minnesota Department of Health, Office of Health Facility Complaints concerning nursing homes, assisted living and other elder care providers view resolved complaints at the MDH website.

If you have concerns about fall injuries or any other form of elder abuse or neglect or Minnesota Nursing Home Wrongful Death Attorneycontact Elder Abuse and Neglect Attorney Kenneth LaBore toll free at 1-888-452-6589 or by email at KLaBore@MNnursinghomeneglect.com.

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