Antipsychotics In Alzheimer’s Patients

Written By: Kenneth LaBore | Published On: 19th February 2015
Nursing Home Resident With Dementia

Nursing Home Resident With Dementia and Use of Antipsychotics

Antipsychotics In Alzheimer’s Patients May Lead to Detrimental Metabolic Changes

According to an article from the National Institute of Mental Health atypical antipsychotics in Alzheimer’s medications are associated with weight gain and other metabolic changes among patients with Alzheimer’s disease.

Antipsychotics in Alzheimer’s Patients

The results of this latest analysis suggest further caution is needed when using atypical antipsychotics to treat Alzheimer’s patients. The researchers conclude that Alzheimer’s patients receiving atypical antipsychotics should be monitored very closely. Besides the risk of metabolic changes there are serious increased risks from medication including lethargy, confusion, and an increased risk of falling.

According to the Alzheimer’s Association, individuals living with dementia may experience behavioral and psychotic symptoms (BPSD) during the course of their disease due to the alteration in processing, integrating and retrieving new information that accompanies dementia. Studies have found that more than 90 percent of people with dementia develop at least one BPSD with a significant percentage of these individuals having serious clinical implications.

People with dementia often experience symptoms that affect their behaviour, causing aggression, agitation and psychotic symptoms like delusions and hallucinations. These behavioural and psychological symptoms can be very distressing.

Around 90 per cent of people with dementia experience aggression, agitation and psychosis (delusions and hallucinations). These symptoms are known as the behavioural and psychological symptoms of dementia and can be very distressing for the person with dementia, their family and carers.

Alzheimer’s Society is dedicated to improving treatment and care of people with dementia to help reduce the use of antipsychotic drugs. We are working with many partner organisations to provide information, develop tools and give support to people with dementia, carers and health and social care professionals to achieve this goal.

If you have questions about medications being provided to a resident and if it has created an additional risk or hazard call Elder Abuse and Neglect Attorney Kenneth LaBore for a Free Consultation at 612-743-9048 or toll free at 1-888-452-6589 or  by email at KLaBore@MNnursinghomeneglect.com.

Disclaimer

Nursing Home Abuse and Neglect Lawyer Kenneth LaBore Offers Free Consultations and Serves Clients Throughout the State of Minnesota Call Toll Free at 1-888-452-6589

Nursing Home Abuse and Neglect Lawyer Kenneth LaBore Offers Free Consultations and Serves Clients Throughout the State of Minnesota Call Toll Free at 1-888-452-6589

 

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